• Dierks Bentley

Bio

Seven albums into one of country music’s most-respected and most-unpredictable careers, award-winning singer/songwriter Dierks Bentley continues to grow. His latest evolution comes in the form of RISER, a project due out Feb. 25, 2014 that stands as his most personal to date.

Written and recorded in the year following his father’s death, the album draws its title from “I’m A Riser,” a song about resilience and determination. “I’m A Riser” works as a commentary on spiritual, personal and societal recommitment, but it also applies to the competitive battlefield of the music industry. It’s particularly appropriate for an album about rejuvenation delivered by Bentley.

“Life in general has a way of knocking you down,” Bentley says. “It’s different reasons for different folks – could be personal reasons, could be family reasons, your job, drugs, alcohol. That song really applies to anybody that’s lived. There have always been those moments when we have to get back up and get on our feet. They are defining moments…breakthrough moments.”

Accepting change – and growing from it – is a key theme in RISER, and it is reflected by the tone of the album, which demonstrates a new artistic depth and an extra level of intensity for Bentley. It evolves from track to track, exuding a range of emotions, all the while impressing upon the listener that Bentley’s instinct for a hit is stronger than ever. Bentley made significant reconfigurations in his creative team to shake up his sonic texture without sacrificing his commercial drive. He re-enlisted executive producer Arturo Buenahora, Jr., who worked on Bentley’s first two albums; and utilized producer Ross Copperman, who co-wrote “Tip It On Back” for Bentley’s previous album Home.

The new atmosphere yielded the most focused and intense vocals of Bentley’s career. Some were recorded live with the band as the musicians laid down the tracks, but others were captured in less-than-obvious locales. One track’s vocal was recorded on Bentley’s tour bus. Still others were cut at Copperman’s house with the producer literally at Bentley’s side, pushing him to some of his most emotional, and seasoned, performances.

“It’s not even really a studio,” Bentley says of Copperman’s set-up. “It’s just kind of a corner of the house he’s taken over, so there was a kind of intimacy to the vocal process. It was important to get out of the studio and sing in different places, and to do it with other people in the room. That way, you have an audience and you get a sense of what’s working, what’s not working, when it’s feeling good, not feeling good. It brings a little more emotion and energy out of your voice.”

Since making a life-altering drive with his father from Phoenix to Nashville when he was 19 years old, Bentley has forged his own path in an industry built predominantly on formula. He has mixed elements of modern country, classic country, bluegrass and rock, maintaining an unmistakable identity while constantly reinventing his sound. His album Home debuted at No. 1 and spawned three consecutive chart-topping hits, marking 10 career No. 1 songs for Bentley as a singer and songwriter. His five previous studio albums have sold more than five million copies, garnered 11 GRAMMY nominations and earned him an invitation to join the Grand Ole Opry.

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FOURTH OF JULY 2017: AJ, BILLY, CANAAN, DARIUS, DIERKS, EASTON, ERIC, JORDAN, JOSH, KEITH, KIP, LADY A, LBT, LUKE, SAM

Independence Day, commonly known as the Fourth of July, is a federal holiday commemorating the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4th, 1776, declaring independence from Great Britain. The holiday is commonly associated with fireworks displays, parades, barbecues and concerts. Some of your favorite country stars take time to remember their Fourth of July traditions, memories and what the holiday really means to them.

Audio / Alan Jackson recalls one of the coolest Fourth of July memories he’s ever enjoyed.

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AJ (fave 4th of July memory) OC: …very cool. :58
Well, this one is hard to beat. A couple of years ago, maybe longer than that now, I had an old boat in Florida. It’s like an old antique motor yacht, and it was kind of a cool old boat. I had taken that boat, I’ve always wanted to take it up north like to New York and up in that area, up in the northeast where it’s so pretty. So, we took the boat up there and Denise and the girls, we all went up. They like going to New York City, which I don’t really care about going to the city. So, I got to stay in my boat there at the harbor tied up, which was cool anyway. So they spent time in the city a few days and then that was Fourth of July, and we went out in the Hudson River that night and they shot the fireworks off and we were anchored out in front of the Statue of Liberty and New York City was behind us, and the Statue of Liberty and the fireworks were going off sitting on that boat. That was the coolest thing and my girls still talk about that. I mean, that was the coolest thing on Fourth of July I can ever remember. I can’t top that one probably. It was emotional sitting there watching the Statue of Liberty and thinking about all that. It was very cool.”

Audio / Billy Currington talks about his favorite Fourth of July memories.

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Billy Currington (4th of July) OC: …of my life. :16
“My best memories would be hanging out with my mom, brother and sister on the beach on Tybee Island right off the coast of Savannah, Georgia. We’d go there every year, and we’d light our own fireworks and watch the ones that they had for us. They were the best times, some of the best times of my life.”

Audio / Canaan Smith talks about his Fourth of July memories growing up in Williamsburg, Virginia.

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Canaan Smith (Fireworks July Fourth) OC: …kinds of stuff. :39
“Williamsburg, Virginia has a great fireworks display. It’s one of the best in the nation, they say or something like that. We’d go to the Governor’s Palace. They have a big lawn, and we’d sit out there and lay a blanket down. This was before I was old enough to drink, but we probably tried to sneak some in anyhow. And we’d just watch the [show], you know they’d have the grand finale, which always blew my mind ‘cause just when you thought it was over, they’d start bringing out all of the tricks and it just gets crazy. We did that on a regular basis. Other times, we’d do stuff in our own yard. We had a big yard when we were growing up with a dirt track in the back, and our neighbor’s yard was equally as big, so when you put ‘em together, we had a massive area to be destructive and do whatever we wanted. So, we blew up all kinds of stuff.”

Audio / Darius Rucker talks about what the Fourth of July means to him.

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Darius Rucker (4th of July) 1 OC: …in the world. :24
“The Fourth of July to me is a day to celebrate freedom. We get to travel all over the world and see a lot of stuff, and I’ve been to a lot of countries that aren’t like ours and that’s when you really appreciate the fact that you can do whatever you want. As long as you’re willing to deal with the consequences, you can do whatever you want, you know?  [I] appreciate those soldiers who died for us to be sitting here doing this, and we live in the greatest country in the world.”

Audio / Darius Rucker enjoys setting off fireworks.

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Darius Rucker (fireworks) OC: …off once. :15
“Oh, I love fireworks. We had the bottle rocket fights and all that good stuff. I was the typical little crazy kid, you know. In South Carolina, it was always legal, so we shot fireworks when it was legal. We did all that sort of stuff. I almost blew my hand off once.”

Audio / Dierks Bentley explains why he is so patriotic.

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Dierks Bentley (4th of July-patriotic) OC: …all the time. :17
“I’m extremely patriotic. I love this country, and I love the history of this country. I read books on this country. I spend my time on the road traveling physically throughout the country. The soldiers and their families are constantly on my mind. We work closely with the Wounded Warriors Project. We think about this stuff all the time.”

Audio / Easton Corbin recalls his family’s tradition on the Fourth of July.

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Easton Corbin (Fourth of July) OC: …clown around. :28
“Fourth of July, I remember growing up and having cookouts, and course we did the whole fireworks thing. I remember my uncle, he’d always get fireworks and bring down like from Alabama, because in Florida, you couldn’t get the bottle rockets and stuff, so he’d always go up to Alabama, ‘cause they live in Tallahassee, which was close to the [state] line. So, he would go over the line and get the good fireworks and bring ‘em down to my Grandma’s for me and my cousin, and we’d just hang out all day and shoot off fireworks and clown around.”

Audio / Eric Church recalls his family activities on the Fourth of July holiday.

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Eric Church (4th of July) OC: …freedoms. 1:17
“The Fourth of July for me, growing up we would always go to the lake, we didn’t live on the lake but we would all go to the lake. Had a buddy who had a pontoon and we would always get on the pontoon and you go out and you’d tie all the pontoons together and just have a big time. This was before, I was younger then, the adults were having more fun than we were, you know it was just to go swim in the water and shoot off fireworks. Basically, water tailgating is what it was. And then as we got older, same thing…we would just, us younger kids had our own boat and we had as much fun as the adults.”

Audio / Jordan Davis says the Fourth of July is a great time to appreciate the rights and freedoms we have as a nation.

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Jordan Davis (Fourth of July) 1 OC: …an American. :18
“I think Fourth of July weekend is a special time to really sit back and be thankful for what we have – thankful to our military, thankful for family and for friends, just a time to really sit back and appreciate how great it is to be an American.”

 

Audio / Jordan Davis talks about some of his favorite childhood Fourth of July memories.

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Jordan Davis (Fourth of July) 2 OC: …really cool. :17
“Probably baseball games, firework shows at baseball games. We’d go to Shreveport Captains games, so yeah, we’d do that or barbecues and fireworks. I can remember being on the lake for a couple of Fourth of Julys. We’d take the boat out and we’d watch the downtown fireworks show from the boat, which was really cool.”

Audio / Josh Turner, who will perform in Baytown, Texas on Independence Day, talks about the fireworks “wars” his family would have when he was growing up.

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Josh Turner (fireworks) OC: …of money. [laughs] :20
“Yeah, we had fireworks around, especially my Daddy’s family. All the individual families had a lot of competition with each other and tried to outdo each other to try to see who had the biggest and baddest fireworks and all that. [laughs] My daddy, I think, was the smartest one. He just went out and bought maybe $25 worth of fireworks and let everybody else put on the big show, so he saved a lot of money.” [laughs]

Audio / Keith Urban recalls coming over to America for the first time.

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Keith Urban (coming to America 1st time) OC: …as I could. :39
“1989 was the first year I came to the States, and it had always been my goal, but I had no plan on how to get here. It was just a case of keep playing, keep getting better at what you do, and then hopefully, somehow, some way I’ll end up over here. The guy who was managing me at the time, we just planned a trip over here – it was actually for the New Music Seminar in New York. And we came over for that, and then we did a trip down to Nashville, and I was shopping my little demo around. I think I humored everybody more than anything else [laughs] with my tragic, ill-fitting demo for the time. So, I left there, but I was just so committed to coming back as quick as I could.”

Audio / Kip Moore says he’s very proud of the U.S. military and can’t imagine having to do what they do to protect the United States.

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Kip Moore (Fourth of July-soldiers) OC: …every day. :32
“I’m a very, very patriotic person, proud of the country that I live in, and I’m very proud of what those guys do for us each and every day, and I don’t take it for granted one bit. My grandparents were in the military, fought wars, and I’ve seen the battle that they go through, just the horror of remember things. When I start to think that I’m half-way tough, I realize how I’m not one bit when I talk to soldiers when I’m out and realize the things that they go through. I can’t imagine facing what those guys face every day.”

Audio / Lady Antebellum’s Hillary Scott talks about her favorite Fourth of July memories.

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Lady A (4th of July-Hillary) OC: …on my hand. :29
“For many, many years in a row, we would be up at the lake for Fourth of July, and having those memories of being on the boat and going tubing and skiing and enjoying being out in the summertime, great weather on the water. But, then for me, Fourth of July was when [husband] Chris [Tyrell] proposed. So, I got proposed to on July 2nd up at the lake, the same lake I grew up going to, and so that’s probably the biggest highlight of Fourth of July to me – getting a rock on my hand.”

Audio / Every year, Lady Antebellum’s Dave Haywood celebrates his birthday along with America’s big day.

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Lady A (Fourth of July-Dave) OC: …and America. :45
“July fourth is always, for me, my birthday week. My birthday is July 5th so we grew up going on family trips to the beach. We would d always go to Hilton Head, South Carolina and always take trips for my birthday, so that’s always a fun time of the year…watch fireworks. I think my best memory would be my birthday party when I was 9 or 10 years old. We went to the batting cages and I remember I was swinging so hard, it was 100 degrees outside, I was swinging in the batting cage and ended up passing out right there in the batting cage. You’re trying so hard to hit the ball, you’re a kid and you really don’t realize how much water you should be drinking and [CHARLES: “Dave was that kid.”] I was that kid who was on the ground in the batting cage, people fanning and pouring water all over my face. Happy Birthday to me and America.”

Audio / Little Big Town’s Karen Fairchild talks about the big sacrifices the military AND their families make to keep this country free.

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LBT (military) OC: (Karen) …whenever we can. (Kimberly: “Yeah.”) :22
“It’s such a huge sacrifice what these men and women do for us, and not only the ones that are serving, but the families that are left here at home. I mean, it’s just a huge commitment that they make, and what an honor. We love to be able to sing for them and entertain them and to say thank you whenever we can.” (Kimberly: “Yeah.”)

Audio / Luke Bryan recalls one of his favorite Fourth of July memories.

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Luke Bryan (4th of July memories) OC: …we used to. :21
“Some of my favorite Fourth of July memories were spent on Lake Blackshear down in Georgia with my family. I was always kind of in charge of driving home from Tennessee and picking up all the fireworks and my nieces and nephews always got excited when I rolled in because they knew I had all the fireworks. But, it was always a great memory, and I miss not getting to do that as much as we used to.”

Audio / Sam Hunt talks about what he and his family did over the Fourth of July holiday when he was growing up in Georgia.

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Sam Hunt (Fourth of July) OC: …good time. :39
“My granddad on the other side of my family, he would always take a lot of pride…fireworks were actually, I’m from Georgia, and most of them were illegal, I’m pretty sure, growing up. But over in Alabama, that’s where all the firework stands were, and we only had to drive 10, 15 minutes to get to the Alabama line, so we could go get a bundle of fireworks pretty easy. But he would always take a lot of pride in going and finding all the good stuff, and coming back with a  big pile. He’d have his torch out there at the end of the driveway and we’d all eat homemade ice cream and put down towels on the driveway and he’d shoot off fireworks for 30-45 minutes. Such a good time.”

 

 

DIERKS BENTLEY HITS THE AIRWAVES WITH ‘WHAT THE HELL DID I SAY.”

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Dierks Bentley has released his new single “What the Hell Did I Say” to radio. The song was written by Josh Kear and Chris Tompkins, who wrote Dierks’ No. 1 hit “Drunk on a Plane,” along with the singer’s producer Ross Copperman, Dierks loves the song and it’s one of his favorite songs to perform live.

“‘What the Hell Did I Say’ is one of the first songs that I heard that I didn’t write, that I fell in love with and knew I wanted it to be on this record. It’s actually written by two of the guys that I wrote ‘Drunk on a Plane.’ They didn’t call me up, but they wrote it with my producer, Ross [Copperman], and they knew it’d be a great song for me and that I’d love it,” says Dierks. “That song is one of my favorite songs to sing every night…I knew ‘What the Hell’ was gonna be a really fun song on the album.”

“What the Hell Did I Say” follows three consecutive No. 1 singles from his album Black – “Somewhere on a Beach,” “Different for Girls” and the gold-certified title track, and it’s also the idea behind his What the Hell Tour, which features Jon Pardi and Cole Swindell. “We named the tour after this song hoping that it would be a single this summer because it perfectly captures the anything-goes spirit out there this year,” said Bentley. “It’s crazy right now with Cole and Pardi…every night is better than the one before…just when you think it can’t get any more fun, it does. I’ve worked my whole career to have a tour like this one.”

Audio / Dierks Bentley talks about the song “What the Hell Did I Say,” from his new album, Black.

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Dierks Bentley (What the Hell Did I Say) 1 OC: …the album. :40

“‘What the Hell Did I Say’ is one of the first songs that I heard that I didn’t write, that I fell in love with and knew I wanted it to be on this record. It’s actually written by two of the guys that I wrote ‘Drunk on a Plane.’ They didn’t call me up, but they wrote it with my producer, Ross [Copperman], and they knew it’d be a great song for me and that I’d love it. You know, I’ve learned over the years of making records that, really in the last couple of years, it’s okay to have some of those fun songs on there. Sometimes when I go into album-making mode, I get so serious, and I almost didn’t cut ‘Drunk on a Plane,’ even though I wrote it. I look back at that now and I think, ‘What was I thinking not to have?’ That song is one of my favorite songs to sing every night. So, I didn’t make that mistake this time around. I knew ‘What the Hell’ was gonna be a really fun song on the album. I just didn’t know where it was going to fit on the album.”

Audio /

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DIERKS BENTLEY CELEBRATES HIS NO. 1 SONG, ‘BLACK.’

Late last week, Dierks Bentley and his co-writers, Ross Copperman and Ashley Gorley, celebrated the No. 1 success of his recent smash, “Black,” which also happens to be his 16th career chart-topper and third consecutive No. 1 from his album of the same title.

The song, which he wrote about his wife Cassidy Black Bentley, had a really big impact on his fans and on the charts. “There’s some songs that have a bigger impact than others. I’ve played No. 1s that I don’t even do in the live show anymore. I just don’t feel like they have the impact,” says Dierks. “But songs like this, I feel like, will always have that impact. So, it’s not just about getting a No. 1, it’s about finding a song that’s a No. 1 but will also, you can see it statistically sell singles on iTunes. But also for me, it’s just feel. When you go out there on stage and watch this song grow from nobody knowing it to people getting excited when they hear the first bits of the music to cellphones coming out with the lighters, to see the song grow that way…some No. 1s are better than others.”

Dierks is ready to release his new single, “What the Hell Did I Say,” from his album, Black.

Audio / Dierks Bentley says his No. 1 song "Black" has a special impact on him and his fans.

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Dierks Bentley (Black No. 1) 1 OC: …than others. :32
“There’s some songs that have a bigger impact than others. I’ve played No. 1s that I don’t even do in the live show anymore. I just don’t feel like they have the impact. But songs like this, I feel like, will always have that impact. So, it’s not just about getting a No. 1, it’s about finding a song that’s a No. 1 but will also, you can see it statistically sell singles on iTunes. But also for me, it’s just feel. When you go out there on stage and watch this song grow from nobody knowing it to people getting excited when they hear the first bits of the music to cellphones coming out with the lighters, to see the song grow that way, you can tell it’s, some No. 1s are better than others.”

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