Bio

For the past couple of years, Kip Moore has spent most of his time on the road, building one of country music’s most loyal audiences show by show and plotting what would become his sophomore album, Wild Ones. He was a road warrior, living out of a tour bus with his bandmates and playing more than 200 shows per year.  For a songwriter who’d grown up in a quiet pocket of southern Georgia, performing to crowds across the world — crowds that knew every word to his best-selling debut album, Up All Night — felt like a dream come true.

Somewhere along the way, though, the highway became a lonely place. The routine was always the same: pull into town, play a show, pack up and leave. There was no stability, no comfort. Things weren’t much easier at home in Nashville, where Moore —whose first album had sent three songs to the top of the country charts, including “Beer Money” and “Hey Pretty Girl” —found himself receiving plenty of unsolicited advice from people who wanted to keep the hits coming…at any cost.

“Once you start having a little bit of success,” he says, “all of a sudden, there’s a lot of opinions about who you should be, what you should be doing, how it should be marketed. A lot of those opinions are great, but Wild Ones was influenced by me saying, ‘This is just who I am. I’m not gonna do what other people are doing. I’m not chasing a trend. I’m gonna do the kind of music I wanna do, and the kind of music I think my fans wanna hear, and that’s the end of the story.'”

From amphitheater tours with Dierks Bentley to his own headlining tours across America, Moore has spent the last three years learning what, exactly, his fans want to hear. He’s a genuine road warrior, armed with a live show that mixes the bombast and wild desperation of Bruce Springsteen with the rootsy stomp of Merle Haggard. It’s a sound built on space and swagger. A sound that bangs as hard as it twangs. A sound caught somewhere between blue-collar country music and stadium-sized rock & roll. And that’s the sound that Moore’s fans, who’ve already catapulted him to PLATINUM-selling heights, want to hear.

When it came time to create new music for his second album, Wild Ones, Moore didn’t have to look very far for inspiration. He just took a look around, taking stock of the world as it flew by his bus window at highway speed.

“Everything that’s taken place over the last two years —this traveling circus, these shows, the band, the toll that the road can take on you but also the exuberance it can bring —it all inspired the record,” he explains. “It’s a record about what we’ve gone through, and I wanted the music to match the intensity of what we do every night onstage. We never go through the motions, no matter how tired and exhausted we are.”

Moore wrote or co-wrote all of Wild Ones‘ thirteen tracks, often teaming up with songwriters like Dan Couch or Weston Davis. More than a few songs were born on the road, where Moore found himself coming up with new ones during soundchecks, inside backstage dressing rooms, and in his bunk at night. He’d arrange the songs, too, coming up with bass parts, guitar licks and drum patterns in addition to the melodies. Sometimes, he’d write some lyrics, scrap them, then write a completely different set. The emphasis wasn’t on creating the largest catalog of songs in the shortest time possible; it was on funneling the feeling of a Kip Moore concert into a single album, no matter how much time it took.

Driven forward by electric guitars and gang vocals, “Lipstick” is the album’s most heartfelt tribute to the road, with each verse rattling off a list of the favorite cities Moore and his bandmates have played in the past. Other songs, like “That Was Us,” take a look backward, sketching a picture of the archetypal small-town Saturday nights that filled Moore’s teenage years in Georgia. “Magic,” anchored by one of the anthemic, open-armed choruses of Moore’s career, is loud and lovely, and “Comeback Kid” packs its punch the opposite way: by dialing back the volume and delivering quiet praise to the underdog in all of us.

Befitting an album that was largely inspired by —and written on — the road, Moore recorded Wild Ones during quick breaks in his touring schedule. He’d book one or two days of studio time, then hit the road for three months, then return to Nashville and book more sessions. Gradually, the album started to take shape. Brett James, his longtime friend and ally, co-produced the project.

“We created a lot of space in this record,” Moore says proudly. “It’s not a bunch of people playing all over the place. We tracked a lot of the record with just a three-piece band. If you go to most Nashville recording sessions, there’s gonna be six or seven people in the room. But we recorded this one with less people, just to allow the fans to actually listen to what’s going on. It makes everything sound bigger.”

“Big.” Perhaps that’s the best description for Wild Ones, a super-sized record inspired by the grit, grind, and glamour of the live shows that have helped make Moore a country favorite. For Moore, going big was the only option.

“I’ve always felt like the guy whose cards are stacked against him,” he says. “I’ve always been the underdog, but I also say, ‘You can count me out for a minute, but don’t think I’ll stay down for very long.’”

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KIP MOORE GETS A LITTLE BALANCE WITH THE NEW BRONCO

Kip Moore debuted a spot for the new Ford Bronco during the CMA BEST OF FEST ABC-TV special on Monday night, and the fit between the two was a perfect match.

 

 

Kip is currently making his way up the country charts with “She’s Mine” from his recent album Wild World.

 

 

FATHER’S DAY 2020

Father’s Day is Sunday (June 21st), and we have audio with many of your favorite country stars! Download the soundbites below.

If you missed the new 2020 liners, click here.

 

Audio / Adam Hambrick talks about what he most admires about his father.

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Adam Hambrick (Father’s Day-Dad)  OC: …about my dad. :45
“When I was a kid, my dad always included me on what he was doing. I feel like I learned a lot from watching go about life and watching him treat people well and with kindness. My dad is a pastor and I watched, my whole growing up, I just watched him serve other people, like put other people’s needs in front of himself and show up in the hospital when Sister Jeanette had surgery or whatever that thing was like any given day, it could be anything. I watched him tile floors in a new Sunday School building. I watched him do literally everything for a ton of different people in a really selfless way. That’s one of the things I admire most about my dad.”

Audio / ALAN JACKSON ALLOWED HIS THREE DAUGHTERS TO LIVE AND LEARN.

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AJ (parenting style) OC: …what they did.  :19
“We try to be just not pushy hands-on parents. We let them live and be their own way. I’m not stern with them. You know, I’m funny and light, and try to give them guidance and let them live and learn their own ways. And that’s something, I think, my parents did. It was accidental, but that’s what they did.”

Audio / Brandon Lay celebrated his first Father’s Day last year with his then nine-month-old son, Ryder. His wife Nicole gave birth to their second child, daughter Lara June, nearly two weeks ago. Brandon explains some of his favorite moments as a dad.

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Brandon Lay (Father’s Day 2020) OC: …to experience. :21
“Honestly, the best thing about fatherhood is just someone that looks up to you. My favorite moments are when (Ryder) is scared and I’m there or he wants to figure out something and I’m there, or he needs lifting up and I’m there. I think that’s a God-given gratification that’s really cool to experience.”

Audio / Brandon Lay is now a father of two since his wife gave birth to their second child, Lara June, last week.

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Brandon Lay (father of two) OC: …embrace. :26
“Oh man! Now that I’m a father of two, it’s really it goes from more than just keeping one little guy alive and still having more me and Nicole time to wow, I’m actually a father. We’ve got a party of four now, not that I wasn’t before a father, but you know what I mean. I’m reaching real dad status. It’s a weird feeling, but it’s one I embrace.”

Audio / Brothers Osborne grew up in a musical family – both their parents wrote and performed music. Their father listened to a bunch of different artists which gave them their own foundation.

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Brothers Osborne (Dad’s music) OC: (John) …anything else. :34
“Our dad listened to everything from Hank Williams to Willie Nelson to even pop music like Mariah Carey and Tom Petty to Bob Seger. You name it and he listened to it, so we really didn’t think about specific genres. We really just kind of soaked it all in, so we listened to it all at one time. It was just music to us. Th ere wasn’t a day in our house without the radio on or there wasn’t a weekend at our house that there wasn’t a party and people had their guitars out, so music to us is like eating and breathing. It’s just as essential as anything else.”

Audio / Caylee Hammack says her father is a good man.

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Caylee Hammack (Dad) OC: …forget that. 1:19
“My dad has this really unnerving ability to be able to build anything at all just by thinking of it. He can look at something and build it in his mind and build it by hand, and it always works. I’ve always respected him for that. He’s a very hard worker.  He’s worked every day of his life. He’s also kind, even when he doesn’t have to be. He’s the type of guy who always gives money at the light to whoever it is on the street. One of my favorite moments with my dad was when we were driving to Macon, Georgia. I was playing a show that night, and we were driving up and we saw this dog and I could tell she was a mama dog. I could tell she had babies somewhere that she was trying to nurse, and she was so skinny. And I’m a bleeding heart. I get it from my Mama, and I just start crying, and I’m like, ‘That poor dog. She’s starving trying to feed her babies.’ I thought, ‘Poor dog.” And my dad doesn’t say anything, goes up two more blocks and pulls into the McDonalds. And he goes through and he asks me if I wanted anything, and I say no. I just think he’s hungry. He goes and he buys three or four burgers, and then he goes back to that block and he drives around until we find that dog to feed it to ‘em. I just remember looking at him, being like this is what a man is; this is what a good man does, and I’ll never forget that.”

Audio / DARIUS RUCKER SAYS HIS KIDS WOULD SAY HE WAS A FUN DAD, UNLESS THEY DID SOMETHING WRONG.

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Darius Rucker (Father’s Day) OC: …loving dad. :41
“I think if you asked my kids what kind of Dad I was they would probably say…Dani would say that I was a fun Dad. My little daughter would say that I was a fun dad; she thinks I’m a lot of fun. I think if you caught them at the right moment they would say I was mean [laughs] because when I’m home I’m not afraid to discipline them. I’m all fun until it’s not fun anymore and then daddy’s not the fun guy. I think that they’d say that I was a fun Dad, I’m a loving Dad and I think they would say that. I’m gone so much that when I’m home, I just shower love upon my kids. I say ‘I love you’ probably fifty times a day. We hug, we kiss all the time. I’m always wanting them to know how much I love them. So I’d hope they’d say that I was a loving dad.”

Audio / DARIUS RUCKER SAYS HIS MOTHER MADE HIM A GOOD FATHER TO HIS THREE CHILDREN.

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Darius Rucker (mother’s qualities makes him a great father) OC: …my mom. :45
“She had a lot great qualities, but she was always, family was first for her. She was always a rock and making sure she took care of us and making sure we had things we needed to have to survive – food and clothes and a home – and seeing that and seeing how hard she worked and all the things she did just really made me the father that I am today. I mean, I’m so crazy and hands-on with my kids. I think it all comes from watching my mom have to struggle so much to support us. And so now, I don’t want me or my wife to ever have to struggle, and I don’t want my kids to ever want or wonder where I am or where there mom is. I want them to always know where we are and always be taken care of, and that all comes from my mom.”

Audio / Dierks Bentley, a father of three, is very grateful to his own dad for turning him on to country music as a kid.

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Dierks (Father’s Day) OC: …that’s for sure. :10
“My dad was my biggest influence in country music because my dad loved country radio. So, we always drove around listening to country radio and George Strait, Hank Williams and Randy Travis and all these guys, so. Without him, I wouldn’t be doing this, that’s for sure.”

Audio / Dierks Bentley explains how being a father (to three children) has changed him.

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Dierks Bentley (how fatherhood has changed him) OC: …different. :07
“There’s a whole kind of different universe that has opened up that I never knew existed, and I’m not the center of it, which is really cool. It just makes you look at things totally different.”

Audio / Eric Church describes his father and the qualities he admires in him.

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Eric Church (Father’s Day) OC: …always admired. :29
“My dad is a, I’m trying to find the right words to describe him. My dad is a great guy, honest guy, very call it like he sees it, which is where I get a lot of that. No BS. I’m gonna tell you how I feel whether you like it or not. I’m that guy, I’m me…My dad’s that way, so I get a lot of that from him. There’s also an honesty and an integrity that my dad carries himself with that I’ve always admired. I think the both of them combined, and they’ve been married for I think 40 years, to be together that long in this day and time is a feat in itself.”

Audio / Jon Langston looks up to his father and hopes to become just like him.

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Jon Langston (Father’s Day) OC: …just fine. :16
“My Dad has been my hero all my life. He’s the man I want to be one day when I grow up. I’m thankful for all he’s done for me and the sacrifices he’s made for our family. If I’m half the man he is one day, I’ll be just fine.”

Audio / Jon Langston considers his dad his hero.

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Jon Langston (Father’s Day) 2 OC: …a great guy. :46
“My dad’s always been my biggest mentor and hero. He’s just been everything to me since I was a little kid. From taking me to every single football practice to being a coach in baseball and stuff to even when I couldn’t play sports anymore and I started doing music and traveling the country and he helped me by renting this family RV. Me and the boys would hop in. He drove us everywhere. He would like take us all over the country. He was taking off work every single week just so I could have a chance, a shot at tis dream. He’s the most selfless, humble human being ever, and if I’m half the man he is one day, then that’d be fine with me. He’s a great guy.”

Audio / Jordan Davis says he loves getting his daughter up in the mornings.

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Jordan Davis (fatherhood 2020) OC: …here myself. :46
“Fatherhood is something, it really is tough to put into words, but one of my favorite things to do is to go in and get Eloise up in the mornings, and I just see this little bundle of joy. She is just so happy. She’s got a smile just like Kristen, and so it really is just crazy to go in in the morning. She could be crying, screaming and then you walk in, and the second she sees you, it’s all smiles and laughs. I don’t know. I think the coolest thing with a kid like her age is just the innocence. You see just how happy she is to be here, and I’m very happy she’s here myself.”

Audio / JORDAN DAVIS TALKS ABOUT HIS FAVORITE QUALITIES OF HIS DAD.

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Jordan Davis (Father’s Day) OC: …my music. :45
“The thing I love most about my Dad is just his overall love of life. He’s a guy that’s worked hard and is now at a point where he can enjoy it, and he’s living every day to the fullest. That’s something that I’m very thankful that I’ve seen my Dad do and something to learn from. So, that’s probably my favorite quality about the old man, and just the hard work too. My dad ran a furniture business in Shreveport for a long time with his Dad. It was great to grow up and see a guy work hard and helped his Dad build a business from the ground up to a very successful business, and that’s something that I even try to carry over into my music.”

Audio / Jordan Davis talks about how life has changed for him since becoming a father to his daughter Eloise.

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Jordan Davis (how life changed when he became a dad) OC: …my daughter. :43
“I asked so many questions to Dads about what to expect and how my life was gonna change. I never really got a straight answer. It was just kinda like, ‘Dude, just do it and it’s gonna change for the better.’ It really is the most unbelievable, just the amount of love you have for this thing that just got into the world, it is indescribable. I can’t put that into words the first time you get a chance to hold your kid. And man, I’m very, very grateful for the blessing that is my daughter.”

Audio / PROUD DAD OF FOUR (HAMPTON, COLBY, MARION, HAWKE), JOSH TURNER TALKS ABOUT HOW HIS THREE OLDEST SONS ARE LEARNING THE FAMILY TRADE.

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Josh Turner (Father’s Day) OC: …one of ‘em.  1:05
“As far as talent and potential, my oldest three, especially, they could do anything they wanted to do if they put their mind to it and their heart was there. My oldest [Hampton] is incredible at playing mandolin. Colby, we kind of noticed him turn the corner lately with the fiddle, and Marion is actually playing a ukulele that’s tuned like the top four strings on a guitar, so in essence, he’s learning how to play guitar. They’ve just kind of started incorporating some singing into some playing, so they’re starting the whole singing and playing at the same time kind of thing, and not only that, they’re even learning to play songs together on their individual instruments. So, it’s amazing to see how much they can learn in such a short amount of time. It makes me realize how much I missed out on when I was that age, ‘cause I did take some music lessons growing up and everything, but I think they feed off of each other honestly. I think that’s why they’re getting so good is because they’re all doing it, not just one of ‘em.”

Audio / Keith Urban – father to daughters Sunday and Faith -- says there are a number of things that are at the top of the list of being a dad.

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Keith Urban (Father’s Day) OC: …experience that. :36
“The first thing is probably just having someone call you dad. I’m like, ‘Omigosh! I’m her dad! That’s amazing.’ That’s probably the first thing to me. I don’t know, I mean, the different personalities that our two daughters have, that’s amazing. It’s such a long list I think. I always say…I think for the people that haven’t had kids – which I hadn’t for a long, long time. I didn’t have kids ‘til later on, and being around it is not the same as having them, you know? I realize that it’s not something that can be explained until you actually sort of have it, so I’m glad I got to experience that.”

Audio / Kip Moore talks about his late father’s influence on his music career, and how he’d play classics on their fishing trips.

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Kip Moore (Father’s Day-dad’s influence) OC: …of us singin’ ‘em. :29
“He would just play all those classic records – Little River Band, Jackson Brown, Springsteen, Seeger, Willie Nelson, the Red-Headed Stranger, Kristofferson, Sam Cook – like classic music. He’d be singing the songs and telling us why it was such good music. And I looked up to him so much, that’s the music I gravitated towards and that’s what I continue to listen to. Whenever I think about those old fishing trips, that’s what I think about is on the way down there, him singing those songs and all of us singin’ ‘em.”

Audio / Little Big Town’s Jimi Westbrook says fatherhood is absolutely beautiful. He and wife Karen Fairchild became parents to Elijah Dylan on March 5, 2010.

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Little Big Town (Jimi-Father’s Day) OC: …beautiful. :32
“It’s still such a new experience for us, and man, I’m telling you, people can tell you all day long how great it’s going to be, but it still never touches it. That little man looking back at me, it’s the most unbelievable feeling. And every day, for me who hates mornings [laughs], waking up to a slap in the face; he’s like pounding on me, then he’s like kissing on me and stuff. It’s unbelievable. It’s absolutely beautiful.”

Audio / Luke Bryan talks about the life lessons he learned from his father.

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Luke Bryan (Father’s Day-life lessons) OC: …live by that. :46
“Well, my dad was, I always just go back to the life lessons that always started either in a fishing boat or hunting somewhere, and that’s why I’ve always kind of been a champion of those types of behaviors certainly with your boys and your children because you get to spend time and hand down values. My dad was always big on just hard work and being good to people and a handshake is the contract. A handshake is your bond, your word. His famous saying always was, ‘Do something right the first time and you won’t have to go back and do it over again.’ I won’t say I batted a thousand perfectly on that, but I’ve kind of tried to live by that.”

Audio / MADDIE MARLOW TALKS ABOUT HER FATHER’S FAVORITE GIFT SHE’S EVER GIVEN HIM FOR FATHER’S DAY.

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Maddie & Tae (Father’s Day) OC: …for Father’s Day. :26
“So, for Father’s Day, I made my Dad – I think it was right before I moved to Nashville – I made my Dad this little photo book where it had like his quotes that have stuck with me my whole life and then some pictures, and it was really funky. It looks horrible. It’s not put together, but that’s one of his favorite gifts that he’s ever gotten, and I cherish that ugly photo book thing that I made for him for Father’s Day.”

Audio / Sam Hunt says his father taught him a lot about being a man and knowing the right thing.

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Sam Hunt (Father’s Day) OC: …he’s great. :27
“I’m obviously biased about my parents, but I’ve been around a lot of great men of integrity, but he is by far the best man that I know. He’s just taught me so much about being a man, doing the right thing, knowing the difference between right and wrong. And even though I don’t always follow his lead, I definitely know better because of him, and that means a whole lot to me. I was just really fortunate to have him as a dad, and he’s great.”

Audio / Travis Denning says his father is his best friend.

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Travis Denning (Father’s Day) OC: …for sure. :43
“My dad – I call him ‘Diamond Dave’ and a lot of other people do too. Honestly, I don’t know if I drink more with anybody else more than my Dad. I think a super cool thing now is getting older and knowing that I’m starting to get more and more sustained as a human that it’s like my parents get to be friends now with me and my sister, which is such a cool thing. And so, yeah, me and my Dad – we love music and we love heavy metal and we love all that. We get to go to concerts and football games and drink beer and just enjoy that cool part of a father and a son and a mother and a son where now we get to be friends and it’s really cool. My Dad is my best friend, for sure.”

Audio / Vince Gill talks about what he hopes he passes to his kids and his grandkids.

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Vince Gill (Father’s Day) OC: …feels like. :40
“Kind, hopefully make them kind. It’s all we got. We’ve got five kids, a couple of grandkids. These grandkids are the complete light of my life. They show up and the rest of the world can kiss my youknowwhat (laughs). I say we’re just gonna go swing in the backyard, we’re gonna wrestle on the bed, we’re gonna eat those Goldfish, you know? And nothing else kinda seems to matter. And then I think what I love seeing more than anything is for my kid to finally understand what it means to love. Man, it’s awesome to see my kid finally get it what that unconditional love really looks like and feels like.”

 

KIP MOORE’S WILD WORLD HERALDED AS “HIS MOST HONEST MUSIC YET” GARNERING MASS CRITICAL ACCLAIM.

Kip Moore continues to be revered by critics, with his fourth studio album WILD WORLD garnering overwhelming praise since its release on May 29. Debuting in the Top 5 on Billboard’s Country Chart, Moore co-wrote 12 of the 13 deeply personal tracks on the record including his current Top 25 single “She’s Mine,” as “Moore toys with arena rock arrangements (‘Janie Blu,’ ‘Fire and Flame’), swampy flirtations (‘Grow On You’), and outlaw swagger (‘Southpaw’)” (Esquire) on the acclaimed set. Moore also self-produced the set, with help from David Garcia, Luke Dick and Blair Daly on respective tracks, with the project debuting at No. One on Australia’s ARIA Country Chart, No. One on Canada’s Country Albums Chart and No. Four on The U.K. Country Album Chart.

“Moore probes growth and honesty with fourth album…Wild World is his manifesto, dropping in a time when we need all the hope we can get.” – American Songwriter 

“When programmed beats and pop-influenced country is the sound of the moment, Moore’s heartland country-rock songs with his growling voice feel muscular, nostalgic and honest.” – Associated Press

“One of country’s more thoughtful artists.” – Billboard 

“Kip Moore is known for prioritizing meaty, vulnerable songwriting in all of his albums. Even by that measure, Wild World is the singer’s most authentic, honest body of work to date.” – Country Now

“Digging deeper than ever before… his most honest music yet.” – Entertainment Tonight 

“Especially vital; occasionally, even rare.” – Esquire 

“A mature yet flesh blend of soaring 80’s heartland and contemporary country depth.” – Classic Rock 

“An urgent record that showcases Moore’s vulnerabilities with confessional lyrics about love, loss and faith, Wild World serves as a much needed escape.” – Forbes 

“Moore again turns introspective on his fourth studio album… He mines deeper into topics—seeking love, seeking freedom, seeking peace, making peace with old decisions…but infuses them with fresh intensity.” – Music Row 

“Wild World is filled with bold signposts about the enigmatic artist, his rebel appetite and his “reckless heart” – PEOPLE 

“Featuring some of the most dynamic vocal performances of his career, the album does a solid job of matching its philosophical undertones with flat-out enjoyable music, ranging all the way from soft-spoken ballads to barroom-blasting anthems.”  – Sounds Like Nashville

“There’s always been something about the country veteran’s music that leaves one breathless. On this album, Moore is aware of it and very much uses it to his advantage.” – Taste Of Country 

“In the album’s 13 tracks, the singer shares love and loss, some life lessons and those bits he hasn’t quite figured out yet, too. It’s affirming and invigorating.” – The Boot 

To mark the launch of WILD WORLD, Moore also performed a livestream set of songs from the new release on his Facebook and Youtube, with funds raised benefiting MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund.  During the livestream Moore raised $136,000 and those donations were matched by Spotify via their COVID-19 Music Relief project totaling over $282,000 raised.

Kip Moore has toured the world headlining his own shows, earning acclaim and a rabid fanbase as an all-in performer in each setting and most recently wrapping 40 sold-out headlining shows in The U.S, The U.K. and Canada. Praised by Noisey as “an uncompromising, genre-defying artist firing on all cylinders” Moore has blazed his own trail. The current CMA “International Artist Achievement Award” nominee first splashed into the mainstream with the double-PLATINUM “Somethin’ ‘Bout a Truck” in 2012, then followed up with three more best selling No. Ones (“Hey Pretty Girl,” “Beer Money” and “More Girls Like You”), a trio of ambitious, critically-praised albums and two gritty EPs that landed Moore on multiple “Best Of” lists. For more information visit kipmoore.net.

 

Audio / Kip Moore talks about the rhythmic movement in his new album, Wild World.

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Kip Moore (rhythmic movement in album) OC: …in the past. :33
“I feel there was a constant stretch for rhythmic percussion. I’ve always had rhythmic movement on my records, but we tried to really make sure every single instrument was really creating rhythmic percussive patterns, their own individual hook lines throughout the song – we didn’t want the drums just to carry that torch alone. I think you really feel that with this record, more so than any other record I’ve done in the past.”

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