Bio

Darius Rucker bio

When Was the Last Time

 

“I love it because it’s so country, and it’s so… so… “ The word that Darius Rucker is looking for comes to him. “… so me.”

 

He’s talking specifically about his latest radio hit, “For the First Time,” but Rucker could just as easily be referring to the entire new album that’s following close on the single’s heels, When Was the Last Time. Fans who’ve driven each one of his four previous Capitol Nashville albums to No. 1 over the last decade could ask for no more greater guarantee than that a fifth one will be so very, very Darius Rucker. Inherent in that promise: ballads that alternately evoke old heartbreaks and pledge eternal vows… barroom-ready paeans to both true love and true suds… blissed-out remembrances of an only partly misspent youth… and, most characteristic of all, an overriding warmth that full matches the humidity of the beloved South Carolina he can’t help but constantly invoke.

 

That level of familiarity should not be taken to mean, however, that Rucker did not practice what he preaches when it comes to the lyrics of “For the First Time,” a rambunctious stomper that asks the musical question: “When was the last time you did something for the first time? Let yourself go, baby, follow that feeling — maybe something new is what you’re needing.” Given the career plateau that he’s been enjoying, Rucker could have taken the attitude of: If the wagon wheel ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Instead, he decided to tie that wagon to a fresh producer, Ross Copperman, aiming for “something a little different for me, a little more upbeat,” and far more spontaneously recorded. When it came to allowing himself to have this much fun in the studio, Rucker really was, in effect, a freshman.

 

“I think having a new producer doing things a little differently is really the story of this album,” Rucker says. He’s been a creature of habit: “Even with the Hootie and the Blowfish records, we worked with Don Gehman on almost every record, so I’m used to having that comfort of working with the same producer. And I loved working with Frank Rogers on my previous (solo) records; he’s my brother, and I’m sure we’ll work together again. But we did such a change-up with this. I knew I liked Ross’s sound from the records he’d done with Dierks and some other people” — Copperman is known for his work not just with Bentley but Brett Eldredge, Keith Urban, and Kenny Chesney — “and when I met him, I instantly took to him and thought, ‘I want some of this kid’s energy.’ That kid is never not laughing. He’s also a friggin’ genius with the equipment and coming up with things that really make the record.”

 

The extra time devoted to gales of hilarity in the studio did not elongate the process. “The vocals were done in such a different way on this record,” says Rucker. “My other producers were very particular. Ross is really a ‘Just sing it a couple times; if it feels good, we got it’ kind of guy. It helped that every time we were in the studio, we had a great band that consistently had great ideas of their own. So this was as far as you could get from any kind of tedious thing. It was really three days, altogether, of recording music. One time, Ross came into Charleston to work, and we had planned five days to do six songs… and we did all six in one day. I was like, ‘Wow, okay!’” Even with no particular need for speed, then, efficacy and ebullience turned out to be an unbeatable combination in the making of When Was the Last Time.

 

That “feels like the first time” ethos is summed up in the track whose gleeful, mischievous chorus supplies the album with its title. The opening lines of “For the First Time”: “You say you never danced to a dashboard singing R.E.M. under summer stars/Never leaned back on a jet black Chevy blowing smoke rings in the dark…” Explains Rucker, “Derrick George brought me part of a chorus that already had that line about R.E.M. We played so much R.E.M. in the day, so when I heard that, I said, ‘Dude, I love it — let’s write this.’ That line ‘You never drank from a bottle of two-dollar wine’ — man, I can’t even tell you how many days back in the day we were drinking Boone’s Farm and all that cheap wine because that’s all we could afford. That song is so…” …well, you know what it is: so utterly Rucker-ian. As he explains, “If I were going to the bar today, and I was single, ‘When was the last time we did something for the first time?’ would just say everything.”

 

But, as he says, he is not that single guy, and so there is at least as much of the new album devoted to endurance, with all the challenges and rewards implicit in a committed relationship. One such track is the single that preceded the album, “If I Told You,” a ballad that trades in bravado for sheer vulnerability. While fans know to expect these moments of unalloyed tenderness from Rucker, complicated emotions aren’t always an easy sell at radio. And so “If I Told You” had a 46-week climb to the top before it became Rucker’s eighth No. 1 country single… a tribute to the song being the ultimate example of a grower, and a wildflower that managed to thrive amid all the lusty party songs surrounding it on the airwaves.

 

“With that song, the more people heard it, the more they wanted to hear it,” Rucker says. “’If I Told You’ tis not that song that’s the kind of ear candy where instantly you want to hear it but after a few times you don’t really care to hear it any more. The great thing for me was that because the song did take a while to reach No. 1, it got more people to hear it. Even at the beginning, when some of the people who were championing it at the end were still saying, ‘I don’t get it,’ the label was like, ‘We get it, and we think it’s a big hit.’ (Capitol Nashville chief) Mike Dungan kept saying, ‘It’s a career song.’ To know they were that dedicated and working that hard for me on that record was great.”

 

“If I Told You” is a thoroughly autobiographical song that Rucker did not write. That’s not an oxymoron. “The first time I heard it, I thought, how could I have not been in this session?” he says. “Shane McAnally, Jon Nite, and Ross sat down and said, ‘Let’s write a song for Darius,’ and every time I sing it now, to be honest with you, it feels like I wrote it, because it’s so real.” Which parts? “Everything! Let’s start with the opening lines: ‘…the two-room house that I came from/The man that I got my name from/I don’t even know where he is now.” That was me growing up. And I went 15 years without seeing Dad. Then there’s the whole chorus: If I told you all the bad things, could you stay? We all want to think that we could say that, but nobody does, because when you start a relationship, or you’re just trying to stay in a relationship, you want everybody to feel the good stuff.”

 

The good stuff and the bad stuff: both come into play throughout When Was the Last Time. “Bring It On” is the unabashedly hopeful flip side to “If I Told You,” with Rucker assuring a woman that he can take her at her worst as well as her best. Another love song, “Don’t,” is cut from the same together-through-anything cloth. “She’s” conflates love for a woman with the love of the South — an easy correlation to make, when you’re as partial to South Carolina as Rucker. Another song where his home state gets a shout-out is “Life’s Too Short.” “I think that when people write songs with me in mind now, they throw Carolina in to make me want to cut it,” he acknowledges — “and it works!”

 

When the down side of love rears its head on the album, it can be playful, as it is on “Count the Beers,” one of two tracks Rucker was thrilled to co-write with George Strait’s favorite songwriter, Dean Dillon. “This guy is talking about how great this girl is, but when you get to the chorus, you realize that she’s a rebound,” he points out. “But regardless of all that, it’s a big bar song, for sure.”

 

“I’m still trying to make an album, every time,” says Rucker. “Even in this day and age of singles dominating and nobody really knowing the sequence of a record like we did back in the day, I still want to make records that people can listen to all the way through.”

 

There’s nothing but totally idealized nostalgia in “Straight to Hell,” an oldie by the rock band Drivin N Cryin that Rucker had wanted to cut from the day he scored a country record deal. That it turned into a riotous all-star collaboration was the icing on the cake. “When I was in college in the ‘80s, that was our tune, man. That was that song that, when you’re at group therapy, late night, “Straight to Hell” comes on, and everybody in the bar is singing it. In my world, Drivin N Cryin were as big as R.E.M., and I’ve always thought more people should get to hear this song. They did it with a country flavor, but I always thought, that song needs fiddle to be really country.”

 

Finally, his wish came to fruition, with a nudge from a pal. “I get a phone call from (Lady Antebellum’s) Charles Kelley, who’s probably my best friend in the business. He goes, ‘I was just listening to this record, and you’ve got to cut it.’ I said, ‘Dude, I’ve been planning on cutting that since I came to Nashville!’ He said, ‘I’ll cut it with you!’ He and I started talking one day, and we were like, let’s get Luke (Bryan)! And Luke, Charles and Jason Aldean are pretty tight, so finally it was: Let’s get Jason on this and just make it a big ole party.”

 

Rucker actually doesn’t need a lot of help in getting a party started, as anyone who’s seen him on tour can attest. Over the course of the 10 years since he signed a country recording contract, he’s turned into one of the genre’s most reliable hitmakers as well as concert attractions. The transition from rock into country, and from Hootie into a solo career, proceeded so seamlessly that it’s difficult to even recall the slight skepticism that awaited him when he announced he was making that shift. Of course, as it turned out, it’s hard to accuse anybody as quintessentially Carolinian as Rucker of being a carpetbagger, even if he had been one of the world’s biggest rock stars before crossing formats.

 

Now, he’s as accepted a part of the country firmament as if Music Row had been the very first stop on his journey. If F. Scott Fitzgerald had lived to see it, he’d have to retract that maxim about there being no second acts in American lives. Rucker’s spectacular second act is making anything that happened before intermission seem like a dim memory.

 

“The thing that really shocks me is that nobody gets two careers,” Rucker says.  “Especially in the same business. You’ve got Ice Cube, who’s one of the greatest rappers of all time, now having this huge career doing kids’ movies and stuff. But when you’re talking about music, you don’t get to go from rap to rock or from being a rock singer to an R&B singer. And here I am getting to play in two genres of music and having success in both of ‘em. I’ve been blessed, man.”

 

This ten-year tenure in country has felt like a natural culmination for Rucker’s musical travels. “I’ve had five hit albums — well, four, and hopefully five,” Rucker adds, referencing his fall 2017 release. “I’m a member of the Grand Ole Opry” (an honor afforded him a mere five years into his country career, pointing up just how quickly Nashville set aside any doubts about the South Carolina native was just another carpetbagger). “I’ve won a Grammy in country music. All that stuff makes me feel like: No matter how many times I play with Hootie now or whatever else we do, this is my day job. The second part of my career is officially a career. It’s what I do — and what I want to do.”

 

He points to two milestones that let him know he was welcome to spend the rest of his days in the country world. “Getting the invitation to join the Opry is a moment that I still picture in my head, and it still gives me goosebumps,” he says. But there was a more recent signpost. “When I was asked to be one of the artists to do that song ‘Forever Country’” — the all-star single and video the Country Music Association commissioned to celebrate the CMAs’ 50th anniversary — ”being part o that is something that I will take with me forever. You look at that lineup of the big stars of country music, everybody from Willie and Dolly to Carrie, Miranda and Luke, and there I am, singing with Martina McBride… Are you frigging kidding me?”

 

Once upon a time, as the lead singer of Hootie and the Blowfish, Rucker might have been asked to come onto CMTs genre-mixing Crossroads series as the token rock guy. Now, of course, he’s the country star who gets asked to collaborate with a rock legend… or veteran soul group, as the case may be. He recently did both.

 

“When you get a phone call asking, ‘Do you want to do Crossroads with (John) Mellencamp?’–are you kidding me? Let’s do it right now! I don’t even have to learn any of the songs; I know ‘em all. He was such a big influence on me as a singer, and even as a songwriter… Then a few weeks after I do that, I get a call: ‘Would you do one with Earth Wind & Fire? Their first choice was you.’ What song do they want me to sing? I know all those, too. In the neighborhood where I grew up, Earth Wind & Fire was our Beatles. Me and my friends would have little dance routines. Those harmonies I did on ‘Shining Star,’ I’ve sung a million times in the car, and here I am getting to sing it with Phil, Verdine and Ralph.”

 

He’s also been on-screen lately as an actor. With CMT’s “Still the King” series, “they told me ‘Billy Ray (Cyrus) is calling up to ask if you’d play Jesus on a show. I think they’re kidding with me, so I’m laughing, and they were like, no, we’re serious.” He’s hoping his characterization of Christ gets a second coming in the show’s next season. On a slightly less comic bent, he played real-life prisoner-turned-singer Johnny Bragg on CMT’s “Sun Records” series. He put on latex to ultimately help families in need for CBS’ “Undercover Boss.” Definitely playing against type, meanwhile, he played a bomb-making terrorist on an episode of “Hawaii 5-0.”

 

He’s fine with sending himself up when the occasion requires. “I don’t take myself too seriously at all. Even going back to the Burger King commercials, I was joking on myself,” he says, referring to a 2005 ad campaign that made Rucker a pop-culture meme again after the Hootie success had died down and before he came back as a country star. “One of the great moments of my life was right after the Burger King commercial came out,” he recollects, laughing, “when I was talking to my boy Ira Dean, from Trick Pony. I’m tight with those guys. Ira told me: ‘Your career’s over.’ And I went, ‘I don’t think so, man!’”

 

As established a country star as Rucker is nearly a decade into the Nashville era of his career, Rucker still has the enthusiasm of a kid in a candy store, whether it comes to the music itself or the little acting perks that come with it. “I’m still honored when I get asked to do things like voiceover work for television shows and stuff like that, even when I have to turn it down,” he says. “In my mind and in my heart, I’m still that kid from South Carolina who just wants to sing for a living, and here I am, 30 years after starting my first band, getting these phone calls — that still freaks me out.” It’s a very mindful freakout, mind you. “I think one of the biggest disservices I’ve ever done to myself is that at the beginning of Hootie’s real success, I wasn’t worried about remembering anything. I was just worried about where I was going to get my next party going on. So with all this stuff going on right now, I always tell myself: Pay attention and remember.” For Rucker, it really does always feel like he’s doing something for the first time.

 

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THE DESIGN NETWORK PREMIERES NEW SERIES WITH THREE-TIME GRAMMY WINNER DARIUS RUCKER.

The Design Network has announced a brand new show featuring multi-Platinum music star, Darius Rucker. “Rucker’s Reno” follows the three-time GRAMMY winner as he revives a historic mansion in the heart of his Charleston, S.C. hometown, turning a vacant city landmark into a modern treasure for his family to enjoy.

“Rucker’s Reno” stares history in the face, exploring how the American South has evolved since the days of slavery, and has since offered a more equitable and inspiring narrative for locals – through the creative lens of home design. The entire new six-part series from The Design Network is available early to viewers now on Samsung TV Plus, Samsung’s free video streaming platform, before rolling out to other services on May 30th.

 

With an eye for design and innate love of Charleston, Darius and his team tackle the restoration of this home one room at a time, while also stopping by some of the city’s finest establishments. Together with the series’ Title Sponsor, South Carolina Tourism, Rucker showcases the best parts of Charleston’s vibrant culture, meeting up with local chefs, entrepreneurs, fishermen and friends as he highlights some of the top attractions in the area, from generations of tea growers to the many outdoor activities this city by the sea has to offer.

“We are thrilled to have been entrusted to tell this story and work with Darius and his amazing design team,” said Jason Harris, founder and CEO of The Design Network. “It’s a big moment for our burgeoning network. It’s the perfect project, with the perfect person at the perfect time.’

“It’s always an honor when I get to showcase my hometown of Charleston to the world, and I’m thankful to The Design Network for such a great platform to do just that,” Darius Rucker said. “The team on this project was so talented and made it such a fun, creative process from start to finish. I can’t wait for everyone to see the transformation!”

“We know our viewers love all things design and culture, which makes Samsung TV Plus the perfect place for ‘Rucker’s Reno’ to arrive first,” said Takashi Nakano, senior director of content acquisitions and business development for Samsung TV Plus. “We are excited to partner with The Design Network and bring Darius’ inspirational story set in the beautiful city of Charleston to our viewers.”

Join Darius Rucker as he transforms his home from the inside out and becomes your private guide to Charleston, S.C. “Rucker’s Reno” premieres on all platforms Monday, May 30th at 8/7 p.m. CT on The Design Network, with an exclusive series run on Samsung TV Plus beginning today, May 16th.

Click here to read an interview  with Darius about the project with Architectural Digest.

MOTHER’S DAY AUDIO 2022

Mother’s Day is on Sunday, May 8th, and some of your favorite country artists are celebrating the mothers in their lives this weekend. In 1914, Woodrow Wilson signed a proclamation designating Mother’s Day, held on the second Sunday in May, as a national holiday to honor mothers.

Audio / Alan Jackson lost his sweet Mama several years ago, and he wrote a song for her funeral, “Where Her Heart Has Always Been,” which is now included on his album Where Have You Gone.

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Alan Jackson (song for mother)…really, really sweet. :51
“I think one song on there, especially I wrote my mama died three or four years ago, four years ago maybe.  I don’t remember now. But I wrote it for her funeral, that’s “Where Her Heart Has Always Been.”  And I really love that track.  It’s just really – I tried to write it in a way that I know she would appreciate it. And then after we had cut it and we were just about to finalize the record, my sister sent a recording of mama reading from the Bible for a Christmas story or something from a few years ago that I hadn’t heard, or I don’t remember if I had ever heard it.  And I thought that would be cool to put that on there.  So, we tried to pick a little piece of that that didn’t sound so Christmasy and put on there on the front end and that made it really, really sweet.”

Audio / Carrie Underwood says she doesn’t really have any Mother’s Day traditions.

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Carrie Underwood (Mother’s Day traditions) OC: …even more so. :38
“We don’t really have like any Mother’s Day traditions. I feel like I remember me and Dad making breakfast for Mom like once as a kid. I’m pretty sure we just made a giant mess in the kitchen and we never did that again, so. Being on the other side of things, I obviously don’t expect anything, but my husband’s really good at getting presents from quote unquote Isaiah. It’s really sweet, because he likes to bring me things. He’s such a sweet little guy, and anytime he’s outside, he’ll pick me flowers and things. So, I’m like, ‘You’re learning. You’ve already got me wrapped around your finger, and then you do stuff like that, and it’s even more so.’”

Audio / Caylee Hammack describes the qualities she most admires in her mother.

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Caylee Hammack (Mother’s Day) 1 OC: …love fully. :53
“I love that my Mom is a no-nonsense woman. I love that she always speaks her mind and she’s super stubborn, because she handed it down to me and it’s come in handy, to be honest. She’s a great cook. I wish I was half the cook that she is. She’s obsessive about Tupperware and plates, which I used to hate, but now as an adult whenever I break a dish or something, I just call her, and I know that I have one on standby. I love that she loves random things so that I can squirrel them away and take them to Nashville sometimes. And I love that she loves big. She either gives all of her heart or nothing at all; she always gives all of her heart. She loves, you know, she has a bleeding heart, and I think that’s just one of the most beautiful traits in the world is to love fully.”

Audio / Darius Rucker recalls one of his favorite memories of his mother.

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Darius Rucker (favorite memory of his mother) OC: …my Mom’s song. :34
“Oh goodness! A lot of great memories of her, but probably one of my favorite memories, I was a young kid, probably eight or nine, and she was in the kitchen cooking and listening to the gospel station and Shirley Caesar’s ‘No Charge’ came on and she was singing ‘No Charge.’ I just remember I ran into our living room which was adjoined to our kitchen and I just sat there and I just listened to her sing that song, and I remember thinking, ‘Wow! What an amazing voice.’ That’s just always a memory I’ve always had, and that song still to this day when I hear it just moves me because that was my mom’s song.”

Audio / Darius Rucker talks about the unwavering support he felt from his mother (who passed away several years ago).

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Darius Rucker (Mother) OC: …in my corner. :44
“My mom was just always great. She worked a lot. She was a nurse and she worked a lot. She took a lot of overtime and stuff to make sure we could live basically, but she always just so supportive, ever since I was a kid. I was always a music kid. Growing up in an African-American neighborhood, I was never that guy who was gonna be pigeonholed to let people say I could only listen to this and I could only do this, because I was African-American. She always supported whatever I wanted to do, whatever I wanted to listen to, wherever I wanted to go, she always had my back. Going to college and everything, she was my biggest supporter and never let my brothers and sisters knock me down or try to tell me I can’t do this or that. All of my success comes because my mother was always in my corner.”

Audio / Dierks Bentley talks about Mother’s Day in regards to his wife, Cassidy.

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Dierks (Mother’s Day) OC: …for sure. :20
“When it’s your actual mom, you know, there’s some slack there, but when with your wife – any touring husband, anyone who tours who has kids and a wife back home, it’s tough man. It’s a lot of work. So, I definitely need to step up to think of something great to do this Sunday, for sure.”

Audio / Eric Church says he’s learned quite a bit from his mom.

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Eric Church (Mother’s Day) OC: …as a man. :57
“My mom, even though my dad won’t like this, my mom is by far the toughest person that I’ve met. She’s tough. One of those people that’s been through a lot in her life, adversity wise and never complains, always really resilient with anything that’s happened to her. And it’s just that attitude, the positive attitude, regardless of what has happened that I think is the one thing that I got from her. With career, she’s always been a person that’s been really positive through times that I couldn’t find a positive streak, [laughs] and she was always really positive, and very much believes in tough it out, keep working hard, and that’s her motto with stuff like that. I’ve always been impressed with that stuff. Then musically, she’s where I get my talent from, musically. She sings great, always has, her mom sang great. I owe my musical chops to her. And she still sings some. So, career-wise, I owe her everything. And just in life-wise she’s given me a lot of the qualities that it has taken for me to get me where I am. Not only as a musician, but as a man.”

Audio / Jon Pardi says his mother, Shelly, is an angel.

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Jon Pardi (Mother’s Day) OC: …worrying about me. :29
“My mom’s always been there for me. First of all, she’s a great mom. She’s an angel. She takes care of people that aren’t even in the family. She’s always been like that, and she’s a great mother. She’s always proud, and she’s always there supporting and being a great mom. She’s just a good human being. There’s not one mean bone in her body. And she cries about every time I talk to her. She always worries about me. I have to tell her, ‘Stop worrying about me.’”

Audio / JORDAN DAVIS SAYS HE’S A “MAMA’S BOY” AND HOPES HE HAS HER KINDNESS AND POSITIVE OUTLOOK.

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Jordan Davis (Mother’s Day) OC: …Mother’s Day. :30 [laughs]
“I’m a Mama’s Boy. I love my Mom, and it’s the way she finds the good in everything. With my Mom, as opposed to finding anything negative, she’s gonna find something positive first. That’s something I really hope I can be more like her on; one of the many things I wish I could be more like my mom on. My mom, she loves flowers, so we’ll get her flowers or take her to, we’re slowly getting her into sushi, so we love to take Mom out to sushi spots on Mother’s Day.” [laughs]

Audio / Keith Urban explains why his wife Nicole Kidman is an extraordinary mother to their two children, Sunday and Faith.

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Keith Urban (Nicole is extraordinary mother) OC: …to see. :45
“She’s an extraordinary mum, she really, really is. Those girls are very, very lucky, and I feel very lucky that the children I should have in this world happen to be with Nic. I don’t know anything about raising kids and Nic does, and that comes in extremely, um, it’s really made for an experience I wouldn’t have had without that. Her patience, her recognizing them as people and not just little kids is really extraordinary. Her attention to honoring their feelings and listening to them right from day one – really being attentive to that is not how I was raised at all, so it’s really beautiful to see.”

Audio / Little Big Town’s Kimberly Schlapman says she always dreamed of being a mother…and her dream came true nearly 15 years ago when she gave birth to daughter, Daisy (July 27, 2007). In 2017, she and her family welcomed daughter Dolly Grace.

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LBT (Mother’s Day) OC: …for my mother. :34
“Being a mother is a life-long dream for me. When I was a kid, that’s what I wanted to be is a mama. It took a long time. I wasn’t ever sure that I would be, but I am now, and it’s the greatest gift of my life. And as I’m a mother now, I see what my mother gave up and her sacrifices and her love and how she made us the most important thing in her life, and that’s what I strive to do for my little girl. It’s the most important job I have, and it’s the most responsibility that I have, and I try to live up to a great example that I had for my mother.”

Audio / MADDIE & TAE’S TAE DYE SAID SHE PULLED OFF A GREAT MOTHER’S DAY SURPRISE A FEW YEARS AGO.

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Maddie & Tae (Mother’s Day-Tae) OC: …was so fun. :25
TAE: “To this day one of the best surprises I’ve ever pulled off was on Mother’s Day three years ago. ‘Cause my mom’s birthday always tends to fall on Mother’s Day Weekend – it’s coming up – and my mom and dad were coming into Nashville and I was like, ‘Okay-this has got to be a big weekend. It’s Mother’s Day, her birthday and the weather was going to be beautiful, so I planned this awesome surprise where we would drive first – she wouldn’t know where we were going, and then we ended up going canoeing down the Harpeth River [located south of Nashville], and it was so fun.”

Audio / Maddie & Tae’s Maddie Marlow says her mother is great at balancing life and that a hug from her mother can fix almost anything.

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Maddie & Tae (Mother’s Day-Maddie) OC: (Maddie) …everything’s okay. :51
MADDIE: “She is so good at balancing is what I’m trying to say. My Mom is such a great balancer, but as I’m coming into our adulthood, and all that kind of stuff, she’s very conscious about when I’m trying to be perfect and have everything in order with everything. And she’s like, you can’t. You can’t do that. Life, you have to figure out how you’re going to deal with the curveballs that are thrown out you. Are you going to catch them and whine out about it or are you going to catch them and move on? Like you have to just go with what’s thrown at you. And my Dad’s been a really, really good supporter on just not letting life’s trials bring you down and letting them just be learning tools and all of that. But, most of the time, a Mama hug can really fix anything.” TAE: “Ahh…it’s the best.” MADDIE: “If my Mom hugs me while I’m crying, everything’s okay. There’s just something about it. I’m grown, but, my Mom, if she hugs me, everything’s okay.”

Audio / Parker McCollum talks about his mother's great qualities.

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Parker McCollum (Mother’s Day) OC: …those from her. :20
“I mean, she’s just a fantastic woman who went above and beyond for us as kids to always make sure, probably even when we weren’t able to have things, she still made those happen. Everybody says I look like her. She’s just an incredibly caring and very, very sincere person, so I would hope I got those from her.”

Audio / Sam Hunt talks about his mother.

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Sam Hunt (Mother’s Day) OC: … with my mom. 1:10
“I knew I had a great mother, and I was blessed and lucky to be born into my family, but until I got out into the real world, I didn’t realize how unique and rare and how much I really hit the lottery with her. She’s raised in the South, and she is all the things that a lot of Southern women are, the good things, but selfless is the word that comes to mind right off the bat. Her life has been devoted to me, my brothers and our family for as long as I can remember her. So, her life revolved around us and that was something that the love that she showed us through those sacrifices has been, I know, a huge part of my ability to go out into the world and cope with all the things that come my way. I’m standing on firm ground, I know, because I grew up in a loving household and that started with my mom.”

Audio / Shania Twain says it’s such a joy to be a parent.

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Shania Twain (joy to be a parent) OC: …means everything. :14
“It’s such a joy to be a parent. So, I relate to all the mums out there who are getting all their love and appreciation from their kids, and I hope, when you’re a kid, a child of somebody, show your mum you love her, because it means everything.”

Audio / TRAVIS DENNING TALKS ABOUT WHAT HE AND HIS MOM HAVE IN COMMON.

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Travis Denning (Mother’s Day) OC: …like crazy. :29
“You know, my favorite thing about my mom, especially as I get older, is realizing how much me and her have in common. I just love that she’s passionate about music. She loves it. I mean, she’s turned me on to a lot of artists, but at the core like she’s still Mom. She reminds me to do things and does these things which that I couldn’t live without. I love that we get to be friends, we get to be best friends, but at the same time, she’s still Mom and she still loves me and my sister like crazy.”

 

 

Video / Mickey Guyton talks to ABC's Good Morning America about being a mother to son Grayson.

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MOTHER’S DAY LINERS 2022

Audio / LINER Brothers Osborne (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey! What’s up guys! We’re Brothers Osborne, wishing all you mothers out there a very Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Carrie Underwood (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey everyone. I’m Carrie Underwood, wishing all you mothers out there a very, very Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Catie Offerman (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey y’all, this is Catie Offerman, wishing all of you mothers out there a very Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Caylee Hammack (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey y’all, this is Caylee Hammack, sending this out to my mom and all the other mothers out there – I hope all of you have a wonderful Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Chrissy Metz (Mother’s Day)

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“Hi! It’s Chrissy Metz, wishing you a very Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Darius (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey y’all, what’s up? This is Darius Rucker, hoping you have a Happy Mother’s Day.

Audio / LINER Dierks (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey, y’all! This is Dierks Bentley, wishing all you mothers out there a Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Eric Church (Mother’s Day) 1

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“Hey everybody! This is Eric Church, wishing you a very Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Eric Church (Mother’s Day) 2

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“Hey everybody! This is Eric Church, hoping you have a Happy Mother’s Day. Happy Mother’s Day, Mom.”

Audio / LINER George Strait (Mother’s Day)

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“Hi! This is George Strait, wishing you a Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Jon Langston (Mother’s Day)

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Hi, I’m Jon Langston, wishing all the mothers a very Happy Mother’s Day. Love ya, Mom.

Audio / LINER Jon Pardi (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey y’all, it’s Jon Pardi. I want to wish all the mamas out there a very Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Jordan Davis (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey! I’m Jordan Davis, wishing all the mothers out there a very Happy Mother’s Day. Love ya, Mom.”

Audio / LINER Josh Turner (Mother’s Day)

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“Hi! This is Josh Turner, wishing you a Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Kacey Musgraves (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey! It’s Kacey Musgraves. To all you mothers out there, Happy Mother’s Day!”

 

Audio / LINER Keith Urban (Mother’s Day)

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“Hi everyone, it’s Keith Urban. Hoping all the mothers out there have a very, very Happy Mother’s Day. Love ya, Mom!”

Audio / LINER Kylie Morgan (Mother’s Day)

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Hey y’all, this is Kylie Morgan, wishing all of you mothers out there a very Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER LBT (Mother’s Day)

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“(ALL) Hi! This is Little Big Town. (KIMBERLY) We want to wish all you mothers out there a Happy Mother’s Day. I love ya, Mama!”

Audio / LINER Luke Bryan (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey! It’s Luke Bryan, hoping all you mothers out there have a Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Maddie & Tae (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey everybody. I’m Maddie & I’m Tae and we’re Maddie & Tae, wishing all you mothers out there a very Happy Mother’s Day. I love ya, Mom.”

Audio / LINER Mickey Guyton (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey, this is Mickey Guyton, wishing all you mothers out there a Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Parker McCollum (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey everybody, I’m Parker McCollum, wishing you a Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Priscilla Block (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey, it’s Priscilla Block wishing all you mothers out there a very Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Sam Hunt (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey! This is Sam Hunt, wishing you a very Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Shania Twain (Mother’s Day)

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“Hi! This is Shania Twain. Happy Mother’s Day.”

Audio / LINER Travis Denning (Mother’s Day)

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“Hey y’all, it’s Travis Denning, wishing all the mothers a very Happy Mother’s Day. Love you, Mom.”

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