Bio

Darius Rucker bio

When Was the Last Time

 

“I love it because it’s so country, and it’s so… so… “ The word that Darius Rucker is looking for comes to him. “… so me.”

 

He’s talking specifically about his latest radio hit, “For the First Time,” but Rucker could just as easily be referring to the entire new album that’s following close on the single’s heels, When Was the Last Time. Fans who’ve driven each one of his four previous Capitol Nashville albums to No. 1 over the last decade could ask for no more greater guarantee than that a fifth one will be so very, very Darius Rucker. Inherent in that promise: ballads that alternately evoke old heartbreaks and pledge eternal vows… barroom-ready paeans to both true love and true suds… blissed-out remembrances of an only partly misspent youth… and, most characteristic of all, an overriding warmth that full matches the humidity of the beloved South Carolina he can’t help but constantly invoke.

 

That level of familiarity should not be taken to mean, however, that Rucker did not practice what he preaches when it comes to the lyrics of “For the First Time,” a rambunctious stomper that asks the musical question: “When was the last time you did something for the first time? Let yourself go, baby, follow that feeling — maybe something new is what you’re needing.” Given the career plateau that he’s been enjoying, Rucker could have taken the attitude of: If the wagon wheel ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Instead, he decided to tie that wagon to a fresh producer, Ross Copperman, aiming for “something a little different for me, a little more upbeat,” and far more spontaneously recorded. When it came to allowing himself to have this much fun in the studio, Rucker really was, in effect, a freshman.

 

“I think having a new producer doing things a little differently is really the story of this album,” Rucker says. He’s been a creature of habit: “Even with the Hootie and the Blowfish records, we worked with Don Gehman on almost every record, so I’m used to having that comfort of working with the same producer. And I loved working with Frank Rogers on my previous (solo) records; he’s my brother, and I’m sure we’ll work together again. But we did such a change-up with this. I knew I liked Ross’s sound from the records he’d done with Dierks and some other people” — Copperman is known for his work not just with Bentley but Brett Eldredge, Keith Urban, and Kenny Chesney — “and when I met him, I instantly took to him and thought, ‘I want some of this kid’s energy.’ That kid is never not laughing. He’s also a friggin’ genius with the equipment and coming up with things that really make the record.”

 

The extra time devoted to gales of hilarity in the studio did not elongate the process. “The vocals were done in such a different way on this record,” says Rucker. “My other producers were very particular. Ross is really a ‘Just sing it a couple times; if it feels good, we got it’ kind of guy. It helped that every time we were in the studio, we had a great band that consistently had great ideas of their own. So this was as far as you could get from any kind of tedious thing. It was really three days, altogether, of recording music. One time, Ross came into Charleston to work, and we had planned five days to do six songs… and we did all six in one day. I was like, ‘Wow, okay!’” Even with no particular need for speed, then, efficacy and ebullience turned out to be an unbeatable combination in the making of When Was the Last Time.

 

That “feels like the first time” ethos is summed up in the track whose gleeful, mischievous chorus supplies the album with its title. The opening lines of “For the First Time”: “You say you never danced to a dashboard singing R.E.M. under summer stars/Never leaned back on a jet black Chevy blowing smoke rings in the dark…” Explains Rucker, “Derrick George brought me part of a chorus that already had that line about R.E.M. We played so much R.E.M. in the day, so when I heard that, I said, ‘Dude, I love it — let’s write this.’ That line ‘You never drank from a bottle of two-dollar wine’ — man, I can’t even tell you how many days back in the day we were drinking Boone’s Farm and all that cheap wine because that’s all we could afford. That song is so…” …well, you know what it is: so utterly Rucker-ian. As he explains, “If I were going to the bar today, and I was single, ‘When was the last time we did something for the first time?’ would just say everything.”

 

But, as he says, he is not that single guy, and so there is at least as much of the new album devoted to endurance, with all the challenges and rewards implicit in a committed relationship. One such track is the single that preceded the album, “If I Told You,” a ballad that trades in bravado for sheer vulnerability. While fans know to expect these moments of unalloyed tenderness from Rucker, complicated emotions aren’t always an easy sell at radio. And so “If I Told You” had a 46-week climb to the top before it became Rucker’s eighth No. 1 country single… a tribute to the song being the ultimate example of a grower, and a wildflower that managed to thrive amid all the lusty party songs surrounding it on the airwaves.

 

“With that song, the more people heard it, the more they wanted to hear it,” Rucker says. “’If I Told You’ tis not that song that’s the kind of ear candy where instantly you want to hear it but after a few times you don’t really care to hear it any more. The great thing for me was that because the song did take a while to reach No. 1, it got more people to hear it. Even at the beginning, when some of the people who were championing it at the end were still saying, ‘I don’t get it,’ the label was like, ‘We get it, and we think it’s a big hit.’ (Capitol Nashville chief) Mike Dungan kept saying, ‘It’s a career song.’ To know they were that dedicated and working that hard for me on that record was great.”

 

“If I Told You” is a thoroughly autobiographical song that Rucker did not write. That’s not an oxymoron. “The first time I heard it, I thought, how could I have not been in this session?” he says. “Shane McAnally, Jon Nite, and Ross sat down and said, ‘Let’s write a song for Darius,’ and every time I sing it now, to be honest with you, it feels like I wrote it, because it’s so real.” Which parts? “Everything! Let’s start with the opening lines: ‘…the two-room house that I came from/The man that I got my name from/I don’t even know where he is now.” That was me growing up. And I went 15 years without seeing Dad. Then there’s the whole chorus: If I told you all the bad things, could you stay? We all want to think that we could say that, but nobody does, because when you start a relationship, or you’re just trying to stay in a relationship, you want everybody to feel the good stuff.”

 

The good stuff and the bad stuff: both come into play throughout When Was the Last Time. “Bring It On” is the unabashedly hopeful flip side to “If I Told You,” with Rucker assuring a woman that he can take her at her worst as well as her best. Another love song, “Don’t,” is cut from the same together-through-anything cloth. “She’s” conflates love for a woman with the love of the South — an easy correlation to make, when you’re as partial to South Carolina as Rucker. Another song where his home state gets a shout-out is “Life’s Too Short.” “I think that when people write songs with me in mind now, they throw Carolina in to make me want to cut it,” he acknowledges — “and it works!”

 

When the down side of love rears its head on the album, it can be playful, as it is on “Count the Beers,” one of two tracks Rucker was thrilled to co-write with George Strait’s favorite songwriter, Dean Dillon. “This guy is talking about how great this girl is, but when you get to the chorus, you realize that she’s a rebound,” he points out. “But regardless of all that, it’s a big bar song, for sure.”

 

“I’m still trying to make an album, every time,” says Rucker. “Even in this day and age of singles dominating and nobody really knowing the sequence of a record like we did back in the day, I still want to make records that people can listen to all the way through.”

 

There’s nothing but totally idealized nostalgia in “Straight to Hell,” an oldie by the rock band Drivin N Cryin that Rucker had wanted to cut from the day he scored a country record deal. That it turned into a riotous all-star collaboration was the icing on the cake. “When I was in college in the ‘80s, that was our tune, man. That was that song that, when you’re at group therapy, late night, “Straight to Hell” comes on, and everybody in the bar is singing it. In my world, Drivin N Cryin were as big as R.E.M., and I’ve always thought more people should get to hear this song. They did it with a country flavor, but I always thought, that song needs fiddle to be really country.”

 

Finally, his wish came to fruition, with a nudge from a pal. “I get a phone call from (Lady Antebellum’s) Charles Kelley, who’s probably my best friend in the business. He goes, ‘I was just listening to this record, and you’ve got to cut it.’ I said, ‘Dude, I’ve been planning on cutting that since I came to Nashville!’ He said, ‘I’ll cut it with you!’ He and I started talking one day, and we were like, let’s get Luke (Bryan)! And Luke, Charles and Jason Aldean are pretty tight, so finally it was: Let’s get Jason on this and just make it a big ole party.”

 

Rucker actually doesn’t need a lot of help in getting a party started, as anyone who’s seen him on tour can attest. Over the course of the 10 years since he signed a country recording contract, he’s turned into one of the genre’s most reliable hitmakers as well as concert attractions. The transition from rock into country, and from Hootie into a solo career, proceeded so seamlessly that it’s difficult to even recall the slight skepticism that awaited him when he announced he was making that shift. Of course, as it turned out, it’s hard to accuse anybody as quintessentially Carolinian as Rucker of being a carpetbagger, even if he had been one of the world’s biggest rock stars before crossing formats.

 

Now, he’s as accepted a part of the country firmament as if Music Row had been the very first stop on his journey. If F. Scott Fitzgerald had lived to see it, he’d have to retract that maxim about there being no second acts in American lives. Rucker’s spectacular second act is making anything that happened before intermission seem like a dim memory.

 

“The thing that really shocks me is that nobody gets two careers,” Rucker says.  “Especially in the same business. You’ve got Ice Cube, who’s one of the greatest rappers of all time, now having this huge career doing kids’ movies and stuff. But when you’re talking about music, you don’t get to go from rap to rock or from being a rock singer to an R&B singer. And here I am getting to play in two genres of music and having success in both of ‘em. I’ve been blessed, man.”

 

This ten-year tenure in country has felt like a natural culmination for Rucker’s musical travels. “I’ve had five hit albums — well, four, and hopefully five,” Rucker adds, referencing his fall 2017 release. “I’m a member of the Grand Ole Opry” (an honor afforded him a mere five years into his country career, pointing up just how quickly Nashville set aside any doubts about the South Carolina native was just another carpetbagger). “I’ve won a Grammy in country music. All that stuff makes me feel like: No matter how many times I play with Hootie now or whatever else we do, this is my day job. The second part of my career is officially a career. It’s what I do — and what I want to do.”

 

He points to two milestones that let him know he was welcome to spend the rest of his days in the country world. “Getting the invitation to join the Opry is a moment that I still picture in my head, and it still gives me goosebumps,” he says. But there was a more recent signpost. “When I was asked to be one of the artists to do that song ‘Forever Country’” — the all-star single and video the Country Music Association commissioned to celebrate the CMAs’ 50th anniversary — ”being part o that is something that I will take with me forever. You look at that lineup of the big stars of country music, everybody from Willie and Dolly to Carrie, Miranda and Luke, and there I am, singing with Martina McBride… Are you frigging kidding me?”

 

Once upon a time, as the lead singer of Hootie and the Blowfish, Rucker might have been asked to come onto CMTs genre-mixing Crossroads series as the token rock guy. Now, of course, he’s the country star who gets asked to collaborate with a rock legend… or veteran soul group, as the case may be. He recently did both.

 

“When you get a phone call asking, ‘Do you want to do Crossroads with (John) Mellencamp?’–are you kidding me? Let’s do it right now! I don’t even have to learn any of the songs; I know ‘em all. He was such a big influence on me as a singer, and even as a songwriter… Then a few weeks after I do that, I get a call: ‘Would you do one with Earth Wind & Fire? Their first choice was you.’ What song do they want me to sing? I know all those, too. In the neighborhood where I grew up, Earth Wind & Fire was our Beatles. Me and my friends would have little dance routines. Those harmonies I did on ‘Shining Star,’ I’ve sung a million times in the car, and here I am getting to sing it with Phil, Verdine and Ralph.”

 

He’s also been on-screen lately as an actor. With CMT’s “Still the King” series, “they told me ‘Billy Ray (Cyrus) is calling up to ask if you’d play Jesus on a show. I think they’re kidding with me, so I’m laughing, and they were like, no, we’re serious.” He’s hoping his characterization of Christ gets a second coming in the show’s next season. On a slightly less comic bent, he played real-life prisoner-turned-singer Johnny Bragg on CMT’s “Sun Records” series. He put on latex to ultimately help families in need for CBS’ “Undercover Boss.” Definitely playing against type, meanwhile, he played a bomb-making terrorist on an episode of “Hawaii 5-0.”

 

He’s fine with sending himself up when the occasion requires. “I don’t take myself too seriously at all. Even going back to the Burger King commercials, I was joking on myself,” he says, referring to a 2005 ad campaign that made Rucker a pop-culture meme again after the Hootie success had died down and before he came back as a country star. “One of the great moments of my life was right after the Burger King commercial came out,” he recollects, laughing, “when I was talking to my boy Ira Dean, from Trick Pony. I’m tight with those guys. Ira told me: ‘Your career’s over.’ And I went, ‘I don’t think so, man!’”

 

As established a country star as Rucker is nearly a decade into the Nashville era of his career, Rucker still has the enthusiasm of a kid in a candy store, whether it comes to the music itself or the little acting perks that come with it. “I’m still honored when I get asked to do things like voiceover work for television shows and stuff like that, even when I have to turn it down,” he says. “In my mind and in my heart, I’m still that kid from South Carolina who just wants to sing for a living, and here I am, 30 years after starting my first band, getting these phone calls — that still freaks me out.” It’s a very mindful freakout, mind you. “I think one of the biggest disservices I’ve ever done to myself is that at the beginning of Hootie’s real success, I wasn’t worried about remembering anything. I was just worried about where I was going to get my next party going on. So with all this stuff going on right now, I always tell myself: Pay attention and remember.” For Rucker, it really does always feel like he’s doing something for the first time.

 

Download bio

News

View all news on Darius Rucker

FATHER’S DAY 2021

Father’s Day is Sunday (June 20th), and we have audio with many of your favorite country stars! Download the soundbites below.

 

For 2021 Father’s Day liners, click here.

 

Audio / Adam Hambrick explains what he most admires about his father.

Download

Adam Hambrick (Father’s Day-Dad) OC: …about my dad. :45“When I was a kid, my dad always included me on what he was doing. I feel like I learned a lot from watching go about life and watching him treat people well and with kindness. My dad is a pastor and I watched, my whole growing up, I just watched him serve other people, like put other people’s needs in front of himself and show up in the hospital when Sister Jeanette had surgery or whatever that thing was like any given day, it could be anything. I watched him tile floors in a new Sunday School building. I watched him do literally everything for a ton of different people in a really selfless way. That’s one of the things I admire most about my dad.”

Audio / Brandon Lay is a father of two – Ryder and Lara June – and it was a bit of transition from one to two kids.

Download

Brandon Lay (father of two) OC: …embrace. :26
“Oh man! Now that I’m a father of two, it’s really it goes from more than just keeping one little guy alive and still having more me and Nicole time to wow, I’m actually a father. We’ve got a party of four now, not that I wasn’t before a father, but you know what I mean. I’m reaching real dad status. It’s a weird feeling, but it’s one I embrace.”

Audio / BROTHERS OSBORNE GREW UP IN A MUSICAL FAMILY – BOTH THEIR PARENTS WROTE AND PERFORMED MUSIC. THEIR FATHER LISTENED TO A BUNCH OF DIFFERENT ARTISTS WHICH GAVE THEM THEIR OWN FOUNDATION.

Download

Brothers Osborne (Dad’s music) OC: (John) …anything else. :34
“Our dad listened to everything from Hank Williams to Willie Nelson to even pop music like Mariah Carey and Tom Petty to Bob Seger. You name it and he listened to it, so we really didn’t think about specific genres. We really just kind of soaked it all in, so we listened to it all at one time. It was just music to us. Th ere wasn’t a day in our house without the radio on or there wasn’t a weekend at our house that there wasn’t a party and people had their guitars out, so music to us is like eating and breathing. It’s just as essential as anything else.”

Audio / Carrie Underwood talks about her own father and her husband Mike Fisher, who's a father to two young boys.

Download

Carrie Underwood (Father’s Day) OC: …guy all around. 1:18
“Well, I am very lucky in my life to have two incredible fathers – my own father and then I get to watch my husband be a father to our boys – strong, amazing men, I am very lucky to be around them. Mike as a dad is just super involved in our boys’ lives, very hands on. It takes a team, definitely, to be able to support my crazy life and Mike’s always running around doing a lot of charity things and he’s always meeting with people and he’s on different boards and stuff like that, so we’re very much switching off duties as far as taking boys here and there to school and  sports and to all the extra-curricular activities. I just love that I feel like we’re such a great team. I love it that he gets to now work with Isaiah on sports and things like that, and I know he loves it too. So, I think that’s one of my favorite qualities about Mike is just how hands on of a father he is and very willing to pick up the slack when I’m crazy busy. Obviously, he’s just a very Godly father, as well. He keeps God as the center of our family and gets to teach our boys all about that, as well. So, he’s just a great guy all around.”

Audio / Caylee Hammack says her father is a good man.

Download

Caylee Hammack (Dad) OC: …forget that. 1:19
“My dad has this really unnerving ability to be able to build anything at all just by thinking of it. He can look at something and build it in his mind and build it by hand, and it always works. I’ve always respected him for that. He’s a very hard worker.  He’s worked every day of his life. He’s also kind, even when he doesn’t have to be. He’s the type of guy who always gives money at the light to whoever it is on the street. One of my favorite moments with my dad was when we were driving to Macon, Georgia. I was playing a show that night, and we were driving up and we saw this dog and I could tell she was a mama dog. I could tell she had babies somewhere that she was trying to nurse, and she was so skinny. And I’m a bleeding heart. I get it from my Mama, and I just start crying, and I’m like, ‘That poor dog. She’s starving trying to feed her babies.’ I thought, ‘Poor dog.” And my dad doesn’t say anything, goes up two more blocks and pulls into the McDonalds. And he goes through and he asks me if I wanted anything, and I say no. I just think he’s hungry. He goes and he buys three or four burgers, and then he goes back to that block and he drives around until we find that dog to feed it to ‘em. I just remember looking at him, being like this is what a man is; this is what a good man does, and I’ll never forget that.”

Audio / Darius Rucker says his kids would say he was a fun dad, unless they did something wrong.

Download

Darius Rucker (Father’s Day) OC: …loving dad. :41
“I think if you asked my kids what kind of Dad I was they would probably say…Dani would say that I was a fun Dad. My little daughter would say that I was a fun dad; she thinks I’m a lot of fun. I think if you caught them at the right moment they would say I was mean [laughs] because when I’m home I’m not afraid to discipline them. I’m all fun until it’s not fun anymore and then daddy’s not the fun guy. I think that they’d say that I was a fun Dad, I’m a loving Dad and I think they would say that. I’m gone so much that when I’m home, I just shower love upon my kids. I say ‘I love you’ probably fifty times a day. We hug, we kiss all the time. I’m always wanting them to know how much I love them. So I’d hope they’d say that I was a loving dad.”

Audio / Darius Rucker says his mother made him a good father to his three children.

Download

Darius Rucker (mother’s qualities makes him a great father) OC: …my mom. :45
“She had a lot great qualities, but she was always, family was first for her. She was always a rock and making sure she took care of us and making sure we had things we needed to have to survive – food and clothes and a home – and seeing that and seeing how hard she worked and all the things she did just really made me the father that I am today. I mean, I’m so crazy and hands-on with my kids. I think it all comes from watching my mom have to struggle so much to support us. And so now, I don’t want me or my wife to ever have to struggle, and I don’t want my kids to ever want or wonder where I am or where there mom is. I want them to always know where we are and always be taken care of, and that all comes from my mom.”

Audio / Dierks Bentley enjoys being both dad – to daughters Evie and Jordan and son Knox – and country music performer.

Download

Dierks Bentley (dad & performer) OC: …to do both. :28
“When I get home, it’s a totally different reality that I wouldn’t trade for anything in the world. Just hanging with my girls and doing the things we do and seeing life through their eyes, it’s incredible. It takes a man to do it. It’s not a boys’ game. It takes a man to do it. I love the juxtaposition to be able to be that man and to also go on the road and act like I’m 13 years old and play video games all afternoon waiting for the fans to show up. So, it’s really a blessing to be able to do both.”

Audio / Dierks Bentley, the father of three, is very grateful to his own dad for turning him on to country music as a kid.

Download

Dierks (Father’s Day) OC: …that’s for sure. :10
“My dad was my biggest influence in country music because my dad loved country radio. So, we always drove around listening to country radio and George Strait, Hank Williams and Randy Travis and all these guys, so. Without him, I wouldn’t be doing this, that’s for sure.”

Audio / Eric Church describes his father and the qualities he admires in him.

Download

Eric Church (Father’s Day) OC: …always admired. :29
“My dad is a, I’m trying to find the right words to describe him. My dad is a great guy, honest guy, very call it like he sees it, which is where I get a lot of that. No BS. I’m gonna tell you how I feel whether you like it or not. I’m that guy, I’m me…My dad’s that way, so I get a lot of that from him. There’s also an honesty and an integrity that my dad carries himself with that I’ve always admired.”

Audio / ERIC CHURCH ADMIRES HIS FATHER, AND WILL PASS ALONG SOME OF THOSE QUALITIES HE’S LEARNED TO HIS OWN CHILDREN, SONS BOONE AND HAWK.

Download

Eric Church (his father’s influence) OC: …same thing. :32
“My daddy’s always preached, and it’s something that rung true, he’s always preached authenticity. He’s always preached being honest and being true. My daddy’s from a small town, you know it’s a blue collar town, and he’s just always been pretty even-keeled; never too high and never too low. He’s always been honest and authentic. I think it’s a good template. It has been for me thus far, especially with this industry, ‘cause it’s really easy to get high and low. So, I think just keeping everything in perspective and trying to be real, and I think people can sense that, and I certainly will tell my kids the same thing.”

Audio / Jon Langston looks up to his father and hopes to become just like him.

Download

Jon Langston (Father’s Day) OC: …just fine. :16
“My Dad has been my hero all my life. He’s the man I want to be one day when I grow up. I’m thankful for all he’s done for me and the sacrifices he’s made for our family. If I’m half the man he is one day, I’ll be just fine.”

Audio / JORDAN DAVIS SAYS HE LOVES GETTING HIS DAUGHTER UP IN THE MORNINGS.

Download

Jordan Davis (fatherhood 2020) OC: …here myself. :46
“Fatherhood is something, it really is tough to put into words, but one of my favorite things to do is to go in and get Eloise up in the mornings, and I just see this little bundle of joy. She is just so happy. She’s got a smile just like Kristen, and so it really is just crazy to go in in the morning. She could be crying, screaming and then you walk in, and the second she sees you, it’s all smiles and laughs. I don’t know. I think the coolest thing with a kid like her age is just the innocence. You see just how happy she is to be here, and I’m very happy she’s here myself.”

Audio / JORDAN DAVIS TALKS ABOUT HIS FAVORITE QUALITIES OF HIS DAD.

Download

Jordan Davis (Father’s Day) OC: …my music. :45
“The thing I love most about my Dad is just his overall love of life. He’s a guy that’s worked hard and is now at a point where he can enjoy it, and he’s living every day to the fullest. That’s something that I’m very thankful that I’ve seen my Dad do and something to learn from. So, that’s probably my favorite quality about the old man, and just the hard work too. My dad ran a furniture business in Shreveport for a long time with his Dad. It was great to grow up and see a guy work hard and helped his Dad build a business from the ground up to a very successful business, and that’s something that I even try to carry over into my music.”

Audio / JORDAN DAVIS TALKS ABOUT HOW HIS LIFE HAS CHANGED SINCE HE'S BECOME A FATHER.

Download

Jordan Davis (fatherhood and impending fatherhood) OC: …ever happened to me. :30
“I’m very blessed to have Eloise and to have another baby coming in September. It’s tough to put into words the change of becoming a dad. It really is an instant change in just your outlook on everything. I think it’s been amazing for me just to come home and see Eloise be so excited. It puts a lot of things into perspective. I think it’s helped with my music. It’s helped with every aspect of my life. Becoming a dad, it’s the coolest thing that’s ever happened to me.”

Audio / PROUD DAD OF FOUR (HAMPTON, COLBY, MARION, HAWKE), JOSH TURNER TALKS ABOUT HOW HIS THREE OLDEST SONS ARE LEARNING THE FAMILY TRADE.

Download

Josh Turner (Father’s Day) OC: …one of ‘em.  1:05
“As far as talent and potential, my oldest three, especially, they could do anything they wanted to do if they put their mind to it and their heart was there. My oldest [Hampton] is incredible at playing mandolin. Colby, we kind of noticed him turn the corner lately with the fiddle, and Marion is actually playing a ukulele that’s tuned like the top four strings on a guitar, so in essence, he’s learning how to play guitar. They’ve just kind of started incorporating some singing into some playing, so they’re starting the whole singing and playing at the same time kind of thing, and not only that, they’re even learning to play songs together on their individual instruments. So, it’s amazing to see how much they can learn in such a short amount of time. It makes me realize how much I missed out on when I was that age, ‘cause I did take some music lessons growing up and everything, but I think they feed off of each other honestly. I think that’s why they’re getting so good is because they’re all doing it, not just one of ‘em.”

Audio / Keith Urban – father to daughters Sunday and Faith -- says there are a number of things that are at the top of the list of being a dad.

Download

Keith Urban (Father’s Day) OC: …experience that. :36
“The first thing is probably just having someone call you dad. I’m like, ‘Omigosh! I’m her dad! That’s amazing.’ That’s probably the first thing to me. I don’t know, I mean, the different personalities that our two daughters have, that’s amazing. It’s such a long list I think. I always say…I think for the people that haven’t had kids – which I hadn’t for a long, long time. I didn’t have kids ‘til later on, and being around it is not the same as having them, you know? I realize that it’s not something that can be explained until you actually sort of have it, so I’m glad I got to experience that.”

Audio / Kip Moore talks about his late father’s influence on his music career, and how he’d play classics on their fishing trips.

Download

Kip Moore (Father’s Day-dad’s influence) OC: …of us singin’ ‘em. :29
“He would just play all those classic records – Little River Band, Jackson Brown, Springsteen, Seger, Willie Nelson, the Red-Headed Stranger, Kristofferson, Sam Cook – like classic music. He’d be singing the songs and telling us why it was such good music. And I looked up to him so much, that’s the music I gravitated towards and that’s what I continue to listen to. Whenever I think about those old fishing trips, that’s what I think about is on the way down there, him singing those songs and all of us singin’ ‘em.”

Audio / Lauren Alaina enjoys Father's Day so she can celebrate, along with her brother, how much he means to her.

Download

Lauren Alaina (Father’s Day best friend) OC: …my brother and I. :29
“My dad is one of my best buds. I absolutely adore him. He is hilarious, and every bit of my personality came from my father directly. (laughs) He is awesome and I’m lucky to be his daughter, and I’m thankful for Father’s Day so that I can celebrate him and show him how much he means to my brother and I.”

Audio / Luke Bryan talks about the life lessons his father taught him.

Download

Luke Bryan (Father’s Day-life lessons) OC: …live by that. :46
“Well, my dad was, I always just go back to the life lessons that always started either in a fishing boat or hunting somewhere, and that’s why I’ve always kind of been a champion of those types of behaviors certainly with your boys and your children because you get to spend time and hand down values. My dad was always big on just hard work and being good to people and a handshake is the contract. A handshake is your bond, your word. His famous saying always was, ‘Do something right the first time and you won’t have to go back and do it over again.’ I won’t say I batted a thousand perfectly on that, but I’ve kind of tried to live by that.”

Audio / MADDIE MARLOW TALKS ABOUT HER FATHER’S FAVORITE GIFT SHE’S EVER GIVEN HIM FOR FATHER’S DAY.

Download

Maddie & Tae (Father’s Day) OC: …for Father’s Day. :26
“So, for Father’s Day, I made my Dad – I think it was right before I moved to Nashville – I made my Dad this little photo book where it had like his quotes that have stuck with me my whole life and then some pictures, and it was really funky. It looks horrible. It’s not put together, but that’s one of his favorite gifts that he’s ever gotten, and I cherish that ugly photo book thing that I made for him for Father’s Day.”

Audio / Sam Hunt says his father taught him a lot about being a man and knowing the right thing.

Download

Sam Hunt (Father’s Day) OC: …he’s great. :27
“I’m obviously biased about my parents, but I’ve been around a lot of great men of integrity, but he is by far the best man that I know. He’s just taught me so much about being a man, doing the right thing, knowing the difference between right and wrong. And even though I don’t always follow his lead, I definitely know better because of him, and that means a whole lot to me. I was just really fortunate to have him as a dad, and he’s great.”

Audio / Travis Denning says his father is his best friend.

Download

Travis Denning (Father’s Day) OC: …for sure. :43
“My dad – I call him ‘Diamond Dave’ and a lot of other people do too. Honestly, I don’t know if I drink more with anybody else more than my Dad. I think a super cool thing now is getting older and knowing that I’m starting to get more and more sustained as a human that it’s like my parents get to be friends now with me and my sister, which is such a cool thing. And so, yeah, me and my Dad – we love music and we love heavy metal and we love all that. We get to go to concerts and football games and drink beer and just enjoy that cool part of a father and a son and a mother and a son where now we get to be friends and it’s really cool. My Dad is my best friend, for sure.”

Audio / Vince Gill talks about the qualities he hopes for his children.

Download

Vince Gill (Father’s Day) OC: …feels like. :33
“Kindness-hopefully make them kind and that’s all we got. Five great kids, a couple of grandkids. Those grandkids are the complete light of my life. You know, they just show up and the rest of the world can kiss my you-know-what. (laughs)  I say, ‘We’re just gonna go swing in the backyard; we’re gonna wrestle on the bed; we’re gonna eat those Goldfish (crackers), you know? And nothing else kind of seems to matter. And then I think what I love seeing, more than anything, for my kid to finally understand what it means to love, and it’s awesome to see my kid finally get it what that unconditional love really looks like and feels like.”

DARIUS RUCKER RELEASES NEW VIDEO FOR “MY MASTERPIECE.”

Darius Rucker has released the official music video for his latest single, “My Masterpiece.” The song has already earned the attention of fans and critics alike, with Billboard noting, “Rucker dips deeper into his forthcoming album with this sweet, swaying ode to a lasting love,” as Rolling Stone celebrates the single’s “spacious, piano-driven arrangement of laid-back drumming, tambourine, and wisps of pedal steel that’s meant to go down as sweetly as Rucker’s romantic words of praise.”

Music Row praises the three-time GRAMMY Award winner’s “positive, sunny, upbeat and engaging” consistency, while remarking that “the happy-in-love theme is common, but its delivery in this finely crafted lyric is exceptional.”

Written by Rucker together with Josh Osborne, J.T. Harding and Ross Copperman, “My Masterpiece” offers a swaying melody and lyrics that prize true love over all else.

“The song is about a guy who really just wants to be known for the tremendous amount of love he has for this woman, and I think that’s beautiful,” shares Rucker. “During a tough time like this past year has been, I think upbeat songs like this are important because they remind people that even when things are tough, there’s also a lot of good in life and good in the world. I hope people enjoy this song as much as I do, and I hope they enjoy seeing it come to life in the music video.”

Rucker will also appear as a guest panelist on the semi-finals of Fox’s hit show “The Masked Singer” this Wednesday, May 19, helping to guess the identities of the remaining contestants and the show’s mysterious “Cluedle-Doo,” the masked celebrity who has been offering additional hints about each contestant in a new addition to the show for Season 5.

DARIUS RUCKER’S CINEMATIC “MY MASTERPIECE” PREMIERES TONIGHT.

Quickly following his 10th career No. 1 hit “Beers And Sunshine” with another feel-good anthem, Darius Rucker will reveal the official music video for his latest single, “My Masterpiece,” tonight at 7 p.m. CT on his Facebook page as he interacts live with fans in the comments.

The song has already earned the attention of fans and critics alike, with Billboard noting, “Rucker dips deeper into his forthcoming album with this sweet, swaying ode to a lasting love,” as Rolling Stone celebrates the single’s “spacious, piano-driven arrangement of laid-back drumming, tambourine, and wisps of pedal steel that’s meant to go down as sweetly as Rucker’s romantic words of praise.”

Music Row praises the three-time GRAMMY Award winner’s “positive, sunny, upbeat and engaging” consistency, while remarking that “the happy-in-love theme is common, but its delivery in this finely crafted lyric is exceptional.”

Written by Rucker together with Josh Osborne, J.T. Harding and Ross Copperman, “My Masterpiece” offers a swaying melody and lyrics that prize true love over all else.

“The song is about a guy who really just wants to be known for the tremendous amount of love he has for this woman, and I think that’s beautiful,” shares Rucker. “During a tough time like this past year has been, I think upbeat songs like this are important because they remind people that even when things are tough, there’s also a lot of good in life and good in the world. I hope people enjoy this song as much as I do, and I hope they enjoy seeing it come to life in the music video.”

Rucker will also appear as a guest panelist on the semi-finals of Fox’s hit show “The Masked Singer” this Wednesday, May 19, helping to guess the identities of the remaining contestants and the show’s mysterious “Cluedle-Doo,” the masked celebrity who has been offering additional hints about each contestant in a new addition to the show for Season 5.

For more information, visit www.DariusRucker.com and follow on social media @DariusRucker.

About Darius Rucker
Rucker first achieved multi-Platinum status in the music industry as lead singer and rhythm guitarist of the GRAMMY Award-winning band Hootie & the Blowfish, who have sold more than 25M albums worldwide including their Diamond-certified debut Cracked Rear View, which remains among the Top 10 best-selling studio albums of all time. Since releasing his first Country album in 2008, Rucker has earned a whole new legion of fans with four No. 1 albums on the Billboard Country chart, including RIAA Platinum-certified Learn to Live and True Believers, plus nine No. 1 singles at Country radio. In 2014, Rucker won his third career GRAMMY Award for Best Solo Country Performance with his 8x Platinum version of Old Crow Medicine Show’s “Wagon Wheel,” one of the top five best-selling Country songs of all time. He recently co-hosted the 54th annual CMA Awards and topped the charts at Country radio once again with “Beers And Sunshine” in February. Follow up single “My Masterpiece” is available everywhere now as Rucker puts the finishing touches on a forthcoming album.

As a lifelong philanthropist, Rucker supports the MUSC Children’s Hospital in his hometown of Charleston, South Carolina and has also raised millions of dollars for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital through his annual Darius & Friends benefit concert and golf tournament. Rucker has also advocated for over 200 charitable causes supporting public education and junior golf programs in South Carolina through the Hootie & the Blowfish Foundation, and serves as a National Chair for the National Museum of African American Music in Nashville.

Video /

Social

Official Photos

Press Photos